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Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 1:46 pm

Hi Tom,

To be honest I really think you should not buy a stone and try and fit it in between the two you have. Focus on your technique and save your money.

I can get my knives screaming sharp with 2 stones and a couple strops and I don't get any extra bang out of using naturals or synthetics.

My question to you is do you really want to spend $200 for no extra performance?

Please feel free to continue to ask questions on our forum. There are other guys with better opinions.

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 2:02 pm

.... just added a correction to my previous post which addresses the 'tweener' issue. I likely erred in raising the original question in that context. Another possibility is that my Ohira Asagi can be enhanced/augmented/supplemented in other ways to make it work better with blades directly from Aoto.
The notion of just rubbing away for extended periods on Ohira Asagi is not a desirable solution.

Tom B

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 2:53 pm

I received some really good advice (IMO) from somebody on this forum (might have been Jason B.). I was considering building an excusive Jnat stone progression, and was encouraged to consider a slightly different approach. The advice I received was to build a foundation of synthetics instead for the sake of consistency and versatility, and use Jnats as specialty stones when appropriate. I found this strategy as spot on, at least for my uses.

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:32 pm

My interests and approaches are surely unique for me and not likely for most others. All of my sessions incorporate a homemade jig, using a heavy sink-spanning base, Panavise, digital angle gauge, bubble level, lighted loupe, lighted 100x scope.

When I do a synthetic session, there is a range from GlassStone 220, Bester 500, Shapton Pro 1,2,5,8K, Hard Felt Pad, Smooth Horsehair Pad.

Infrequently I do an Arkansas session with a range from Norton Crystlon, India, White (Washita?), Hard Translucent, Hard Black. DMT DuoSharp, Norton Flattening Stone(s) are also used.

Newest session is JNS with only Aoto and Ohira Asagi. Likely additions are Igarashi, Yaginoshima Asagi, Takashima, Atagoyama. No question ..... only way is to acquire and use these stones to truly understand how they perform.

Compounds and stropping is a future interest which complements all of these stone groupings.

This current struggle is due to acquistion of a JNS beyond my current (even future) needs. Before offering it for sale, I am trying to find steps to make it of some practical use during my JNS sessions. Mark's suggestion using a sequence of slurries is intriguing and most likely to be tried. I have one nagura (and a few finger stones) provided with the Ohira Asagi and need to better understand what other nagura may work well.

Tom B

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 5:22 pm

Nagura sounds like the way to go. But Nagura are, again, pieces of stone, so you will have the same issues finding one that suits you. There are synthetic naguras, but it sounds you want to go all-natural.

Here's what I'd do: But a small assortment of finger stones, and determine which is which. Then use them like a nagura, and then talk to a natural stone expert about which one you like to use as a nagura and see if they can guide you.

I think a lot of the fun in natural stones is going beyond function and sharpening for the sake of sharpening.

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 5:31 pm

I haven't taken time to use the finger stones but am now motivated to try what you suggest. I was a bit apprehensive at first with the Ohira Asagi, but now realize it is so hard and fine, there is little I can do to cause any real problems. It should become clear quickly how much slurry the finger stones generate and which are for what purpose.

Here is a pic of Aoto, Ohira Asagi, finger stones (left), nagura (ctr), sample coarse stones (right). I have no sense of the nagura other than it seems fairly hard but generates modest slurry on the Asagi.

Image

Thanks,
Tom B

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:04 pm

burkecutlery wrote:Nagura sounds like the way to go. But Nagura are, again, pieces of stone, so you will have the same issues finding one that suits you. There are synthetic naguras, but it sounds you want to go all-natural.

Here's what I'd do: But a small assortment of finger stones, and determine which is which. Then use them like a nagura, and then talk to a natural stone expert about which one you like to use as a nagura and see if they can guide you.

I think a lot of the fun in natural stones is going beyond function and sharpening for the sake of sharpening.


We have bags of mixed ones and I try to mark which is which on each stone. These have become popular items. I use the scraps from the cut up edge pro stones.
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/fingerstones.html

Usually I try and put 10- 12 pieces in each bag and the stones vary based on what I have.

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:16 pm

What is the grit range, hardness, and cutting speed of the Ohira Asagi?

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:13 pm

Maxim stated Lv3/3.5 (thought is was a bit softer than others in same batch). No grit range given but beginning around 9-10K as he compared to my Shapton Pro 8K. I have no JNS comparison, but stone cuts pretty slowly using nagura provided. No detail on nagura, but pic earlier shows the color.

Tom B

Re: What's a good natural to use as a tweener stone?

Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:59 am

Great, let us know how you like them!

I think it's a good way to try a bunch of different stone types, because fingerstones are often mixed hard and soft, muddy and dense, etc. They don't all make good slurries--my favorite fingerstone makes for a TERRIBLE edge, but a beautiful jigane. But it is a cheap way to try different things!
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