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 Post subject: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 10:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7352
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Hello, I'm looking for a kiritsuke knife that I can use on an every day basis at work and not have to worry about it rusting. I usually clean my knives after every item I cut, but sometimes get busy and forget. Also, don't want it to be longer than 240mm. I was also hoping you could recommend a nice gyuto as well. Looking for something in the 100-200 range but also need it to be a knife that doesn't need to be babied. I was looking at the takamura r2. Any other suggestions would be great.



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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 10:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7352
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Do you want a single sided kiritsuke or a double sided one?



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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 2:22 am 

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 2:21 am
Posts: 21
I'm not sure exactly what the difference is as far as making cuts. I'm assuming a single bevel is best for push cuts and a double can do either?


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 4:49 am 

Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:57 pm
Posts: 565
The single-bevel kiritsuke is going to be a far more specialized knife, requiring particular technique. It will steer through ingredients. If you are looking for an everyday knife you would probably be better served with a double-bevel kiritsuke, unless you are particularly skilled with single-bevel knives.

In order to help you select one, I'm curious: why a kiritsuke and a gyuto rather than just a gyuto? What are you hoping to gain with a kiritsuke?


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 1:31 pm 

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 2:21 am
Posts: 21
I already have a few gyutos and really like the style of a kiritsuke and feel. I'm also not opposed to any bunka double bevel suggestions as well.


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:42 pm 

Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:11 pm
Posts: 220
Location: San Diego
I am curious about what others think about a kiri in a work environment. With such a pronounced and exposed tip, I'd be concerned about it getting damaged. I know the same could be said of sabatier profiles and many others, but kiris always looked pretty extreme on the pointedness scale


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 10:59 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 12:07 am
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The reason Kiritsuke tips are so delicate isn't directly related to them being pointy, but rather where they are located. With the tip being at the bottom, along the cutting edge, it is as extremely thin as the cutting edge with no metal behind it for support. Add in the flat profile and many users will snag the tip into the board while cutting and with being so thin it will snap off. They are designed primarily for draw cuts with very light pressure on the board, though they can be used for push cutting if you lead with heel(heel slightly down and tip slightly up). They would be very limiting in a work environment imo.

Single vs double bevel, Single bevels are best suited in really soft ingredients(think sashimi) or ingredients that are shorter than the bevel. Anything taller than the bevel will lead to steering. Mel did a great photo illustration here viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4930&hilit=single.

I suggest avoiding a kiritsuke for western style cooking and using that money on a good gyuto, but if you are set on getting one...
The only stainless one that comes to mind is the double bevel Kono HH http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kohhstki24.html


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 1:55 am 

Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:00 am
Posts: 606
socalboo wrote:I am curious about what others think about a kiri in a work environment. With such a pronounced and exposed tip, I'd be concerned about it getting damaged. I know the same could be said of sabatier profiles and many others, but kiris always looked pretty extreme on the pointedness scale



I think it's the long flat edge. For example we do a fine julienned carrot for salads, although they are 3 1/2 inches long. Having that long flat board contact that a kiritsuke offers without being a 270/300mm gyuto is a plus. It isn't for every job in the kitchen but it has it's place.


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:26 pm 

Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:11 pm
Posts: 220
Location: San Diego
Lunatic wrote:
socalboo wrote:I am curious about what others think about a kiri in a work environment. With such a pronounced and exposed tip, I'd be concerned about it getting damaged. I know the same could be said of sabatier profiles and many others, but kiris always looked pretty extreme on the pointedness scale



I think it's the long flat edge. For example we do a fine julienned carrot for salads, although they are 3 1/2 inches long. Having that long flat board contact that a kiritsuke offers without being a 270/300mm gyuto is a plus. It isn't for every job in the kitchen but it has it's place.


Gotcha. Could that same contact be replicated with something like a nakiri with flat profile?


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 Post subject: Re: Kiritsuke wanted
PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 10:59 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:34 pm
Posts: 327
From what I have learned here and elsewhere the Kiritsuke is designed for master sushi chefs.
In Japan, only the master chef may use the Kiri.
Hey Man, the Kiriitsuke blade profile is bad ass!! :twisted: Until you break the tip off. :(
That said, and if you are going to be using it in a commercial environment, given you already have a few Gyutos, IMHO a good Nakiri would serve you well.
There is a good selection on the site right now.
I think you said you wanted a carbon.
Here is a good looking Nakiri with a western handle:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/buwena16.html

If you like a Japanese handle Mark Richmond Lasers are highly regarded on this site.
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/rilaaosuna.html

There are several other good choices, check them out.


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