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 Post subject: Iron cladding reactivity
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:50 pm 

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:02 am
Posts: 276
I've assumed that over a couple months the iron would settle down and form a nice patina with proper care. I've been wiping and drying during use religiously possibly bordering on compulsively but never leaving it sitting dirty.

Things I have noticed with this knife so far: the iron cladding does not seem too thick above the edge, slight thinning has really given it a beautiful design where the core steel comes through. the blue steel core, where exposed, has developed a strong patina and is very stable. Vegetables both high and low acidity darken the iron substantially, but cutting lemons for service will strip this off and leave the iron looking like new. Non citrus fruits seem to make it turn brown the most and it usually happens on the side of the knife that is laying on the cutting board. It's not bright orange or fuzzy, though.

So I guess I'm at a point where I need to device if I should force something (assuming) lemons won't strip that off also. Or do I ignore the brown and let this thing really develop on its own? Over also had a coo worker recommend spraying it with a small amount of tsubaki oil after each shift to help the iron settle down.


Last edited by Nbles on Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Iron cladding reactivity
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:23 pm 

Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2012 11:01 pm
Posts: 403
Location: ATL
damn auto-corrrect. I'm a let things happen naturally type of person.


Last edited by snipes on Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Iron cladding reactivity
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:00 pm
Posts: 2329
Nbles - your auto correct is having a seriously bad Monday :-).

If acidic fruits, especially lemons, are undoing your cladding patina, why not just use a stainless Petty or something for those items and see if the patina will hold up? Just a thought.


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 Post subject: Re: Iron cladding reactivity
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:31 pm 

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:02 am
Posts: 276
I cut them at the end of prep because it's an easy task to clean up quickly if we get early orders. I also try to get everything but what I need for service put away by then. Id use a different knife for service but I prefer having a gyuto out during service. No complaining about the lemon either, just trying to learn more.


I need to not post long posts from my phone :) I hope it all made sense.


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 Post subject: Re: Iron cladding reactivity
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:47 pm 

Joined: Thu May 29, 2014 8:38 pm
Posts: 1208
Guess it's what you prefer in aesthetics at this point as it doesn't sound like there is any discoloration of food going on. You could try forcing a patina, and if you don't like it, you can polish it off. I found raw bacon does a really good job setting a strong, fairly attractive patina with plenty of blue and purple. Describe what I did here with some pictures: http://www.chefknivestogoforum.com/patina-turner-t6924.html



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 Post subject: Re: Iron cladding reactivity
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 7:35 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4054
I found pork seems to develop a nice patina too. It's not iron but my white #2 suji took on a crazy fast patina after slicing a few hams. I love the natural look too.



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