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 Post subject: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 8:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 11:20 pm
Posts: 125
Location: VA, USA
Would those in the know care to share their tips and tricks for wa-handle maintenance? I'm thinking some walnut oil followed by a couple of days in good indirect sunlight would be OK.............?

Thanks, look forward to all the suggestions!

Rich



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 Post subject: Re: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 10:41 am 
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Joined: Wed May 09, 2012 3:59 pm
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Location: Cape Town - South Africa
Look here:

wa-handle-care-t190.html

:)



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 Post subject: Re: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 3:27 pm 
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Location: USA... mostly.
RICH <> Let the wood get wet and then let it air dry. This might have no effect on your handles, but in all likelihood will cause the grain to rise. I then sand it lightly with fine paper, then with 000 steel wool. Slather the handles pretty liberally with a beeswax/mineral oil paste consisting of 20% beeswax:80% mineral oil mixed in a double-boiler, wipe off excess, let it sit overnight, then buff it in the morning. You could do that a few nights in a row or as needed until the handle feels silky smooth, polished and “sealed” (although, technically it’s not really sealed).



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 Post subject: Re: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 4:54 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7785
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Hello,

I purchased a Masamoto KS from you a while back. The knife is really good, but I wonder if I should take any particular measures to make sure that the handle keeps intact. Would "drenching" it in plain cooking oil do the trick, or should I be more thorough?

Best regards,
David



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 Post subject: Re: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 4:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
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Location: Madison Wisconsin
Try the above method. If you use regular cooking oil it will go rancid. Mineral oil is a better solution and adding some beeswax as suggested is better still.



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 Post subject: Re: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:09 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 10:49 pm
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Location: California
If you don't mind losing a little of the grain texture, carnauba wax is my preferred treatment. I basically burnish the wood with a block of wax until it has an even coat, then heat it with a hair dryer until it sinks in. Totally waterproof and it doesn't get sticky like beeswax when your body heat warms it up.


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 Post subject: Re: Handle Maintenance
PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:44 pm 

Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2012 10:03 am
Posts: 229
Are we talking non-stabilized wood here? My Laguiole knives which have handles of stabilized wood still look great, without any maintenance. They're used almost daily and I've had them for over 10 years.

Also Tim, who rehandled my Artifex with stabilized wood, recommended nothing more than a little oil, sparingly, once in a while.


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