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 Post subject: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 4:32 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 9:23 pm
Posts: 54
These knives have a curious shape near the handle.
What is the reason for this ?


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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 4:42 pm
Posts: 2873
Location: USA... mostly.
What knife/knives are you specifically referencing?



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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:25 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 9:23 pm
Posts: 54
Ones like this...

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/riarbokn16.html


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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 6:05 pm 
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No specific knowledge, but I've always assumed it's to prevent your hand from slipping into the blade.



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http://marrknives.com
http://facebook.com/marrknives
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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 6:13 pm 
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Location: USA... mostly.
Well, number one.. it projects the manipulated bone/joint away from tang centerline as you're working. Two, it's effective on a push cut. There can be times in which a push allows better leverage or angle. For instance, trimming silverskin I will often use an upwards push into the butt-end of a beef tenderloin to get the silverskin out of the three lobes. Furthermore, it allows a roll into a cut. There can be times in which I want to push & roll the heel into a cut to extract a small or large section. For instance, while frenching a lamb rack on-the-fly, I will come down between the ribs towards the eye side and roll the heel at the bottom of the stroke; then coming up the inside of the other rib... almost "scooping" out the fat/membranes/connective tissue.

I am not a knife designer, but these are a few ways in which I have used and recognized said design excels at...



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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 9:53 pm 

Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:44 pm
Posts: 157
I love the hands on knowledge Melampus is bringing to this thread. I totally agree. Adam Marr also brings up a great point, The last thing you want to happen is to use to much inward force on a knife and have the blade slip into your hand. So how do we sharpen that curve? I'm thinking a rounded section on the corner of a stone..?


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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a large butcher's knife
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:57 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 9:23 pm
Posts: 54
At first I thought it might be for hand safety but after further examination, it seems there would be better ways that could be accomplished compared with just exposed blade sticking out lower than the wooden handle.

Hence my question. Wasn't sure what cutting features it might possess. Sounds like Melampus uses that blade shape to his advantage.

I have the same question about other knives. Specifically a large butcher's knife. It seems they have a curved blade and rounded, bulbous tip, quite the opposite of a boning knife. What are those features for ?

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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 12:01 am 

Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 9:23 pm
Posts: 54
Here's another example:
Image

Another note on rejecting the safety idea... I thought if it were for safety... why is that the only knife that has that particular
feature. Basically, that's why I assumed it was a cutting feature, not a safety feature.


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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a western boning knife
PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 1:39 am 

Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:19 pm
Posts: 62
I'm no expert, but in my experience, the bulbous shape works very well for breaking down large cuts of meat -- stuff that's larger than the length of the blade. I've got one, and about the only time I use it is when doing whole briskets.


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 Post subject: Re: The shape of a large butcher's knife
PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 12:14 pm 

Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 7:12 pm
Posts: 50
MrDelicious wrote:I have the same question about other knives. Specifically a large butcher's knife. It seems they have a curved blade and rounded, bulbous tip, quite the opposite of a boning knife. What are those features for ?



I'm not a meatworker but I've found that the wider blades help to keep the cut straight and even when slicing thru large hunks of meat. I find thinner tipped blades harder to control


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