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Victorinox Honing

Mon Jan 07, 2013 1:48 pm

Hi there people

Great to be a part of this community.

I have been honing my knife collection for a while.
My collection ranges from Wiltshire, some sheffield stainless steel knives, got a wusthof and i got henckels and a kasumi.

I havent sharpened wusthof, henckels and kasumi yet as i havnt used them!

I got given a massive collection of 'Nella' knives from some chefs which ive been practising on.

Ive noticed with these knives i am having to hone them at about 35 degrees. Am i correct in doing this or should no knife be honed like this?
It seems to bring out the sharpness in them though.

According to this video here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUdrRE7W0b4


I am to put 4 - 6 LBS pressure on each sharpening stroke. Now that seems an awful lot.

Is that true?

Though i do find with my Victorinox knives and Nella ones it does make them sharp but am i damaging them and will eventually ruin them?

I'm putting 4 - 6 LBS pressure each hone.

But this guy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Teh0Cw84QGQ is saying different things to this guy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUdrRE7W0b4

Hard to know whats true!

The same applies to my victorinox Fibrox collection.

When honed at around 30 degrees with hard pressure it does make them sharp BUT i could be slowly ruining them. Need you guys to please help me out with correct angles, LBS of pressure and how often to hone them.

another way i picked up from honing myself is to keep the angle of the knife when i get resistance on the rod from honing it if you know what i mean? Like i keep going more obtuse until i get a bit of resistance then i feel thats the point it needs honing at? Is this also correct?

Hygiplas if anyones heard of these? Seem to be giving me resistence at about 35 degrees so i maintain that 35 degree angle with 5 LBS pressure. But they do come out very sharp. Though this could be the wrong thing to do!

Thanks!

Tel

Re: Victorinox Honing

Mon Jan 07, 2013 10:24 pm

What are you honing with?

Re: Victorinox Honing

Tue Jan 08, 2013 7:02 am

Hey.

I am honing with a steel honing rod.

I cant seem to see the brand its got this wierd drawing/letter then it says 'VO'

Its just a standard grooved honing steel.

Hope this helps!

Thanks

Re: Victorinox Honing

Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:09 pm

yer gonna need some stones.

a dual grit stone like a 250/1000 would be a great start if that's what you've got for the moment.

Re: Victorinox Honing

Tue Jan 08, 2013 8:55 pm

Law#1 - No grooved rods for honing. Use a smooth steel or a ceramic rod, a fine or micro-grooved steel at the worst. Your knives will thank you for it.
I prefer the Idahone fine if I'm using a rod. http://www.chefknivestogo.com/idahone.html If you were to use a ceramic rod after using a grooved steel you would be amazed in the difference.
When honing with a rod, steady consistent strokes is what is important, not speed.
As far as pressure, I've never measured but I use somewhat of a light stroke. I would listen to Bob Krammer before the EZCooking dude!
Honing will help to touch up between sharpenings but you do need some stones to sharpen.

Re: Victorinox Honing

Wed Jan 09, 2013 1:40 am

Hi there.

Thanks for the replies there folks.

How do i know when to actually sharpen a knife?

When honing makes no difference?

Is it also important to hone before and after every use of the knife?

I will look into getting the idahone.
Would you recommend a diamond sharpening steel for any of the knife collection i have?

Thanks.

Re: Victorinox Honing

Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:35 am

How do i know when to actually sharpen a knife?
When honing makes no difference?.....
There is no "right time". It's mostly personal preference. Any time that your not happy with the knifes performance is time.

Is it also important to hone before and after every use of the knife?....
Personally I give about three strokes on each side before I put the knife away but again, it's personal preference.

I will look into getting the idahone.
Would you recommend a diamond sharpening steel for any of the knife collection i have?....
With stones and an Idahone there is no reason for diamond steels and they're not good for the edge of most knifes anyway.

Just my .02 and I'm not always the sharpest knife in the drawer. :lol:

Re: Victorinox Honing

Wed Jan 09, 2013 5:41 am

honing a victorinox will help but will not keep you from sharpening it for long. it'll just help true the blade and that's all.

Any time that your not happy with the knifes performance is time. --> +1

when honing, consistent yes, and also light strokes, but not too light, never firm.

with me, when i true my blade on a steel, i try to follow the angle of sharpening as well. so i don't round out the edge when doing so.

Re: Victorinox Honing

Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:15 am

Thanks people very much for your answers.

I have purchased the Idahone 1200 which has helped a bit but actually looking at the blade it has a few little nicks in it and its very rough on the idahone because of the slight jaggedness of the blade from loads of use.

I suppose resetting the bevel is now the thing i should do right? then work my way up the grits and finish on the idahone?

I really need some advice please on what grit stone i should use to reset the bevel then after that what do i need to do?

Would i need a stone to reset the bevel or a chefschoice?

What does a bevel look like when it is reset? does it just not exist? It just grinds it down to nothing?

I must stress this is a victorinox knife and if anyone has any experience in resetting their bevels and then sharpening them really sharp i'd really love to know!

Thanks people.

Re: Victorinox Honing

Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:34 am

Terry - watch videos on YouTube about sharpening...or the videos here that Mark has posted. You will learn very quickly.

Here is the link: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/knshforne1.html


Also, best thing to start with is a 400 grit stone and a 1000 grit stone. I would recommend the Chosera stones for someone starting out - great stone, will last a long time and give you a great sense of what is happening to your knife bevel.

Good luck!
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