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to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:57 pm

I just ordered the 52100 sab artifex and am looking forward to my first carbon knife. After reading more than I'll ever need to know about baking soda and mineral oil, I find myself at a crossroad. How much benefit comes (beyond aesthetics) comes from the forced patina or am I better off in the long run letting it happen naturally?

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:13 pm

If the knife is not so reactive that it causes problems with food I like to let it happen naturally.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:15 pm

I like it natural... it's fun to watch happen over a few days or weeks depending on knife use :)

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:22 pm

I prefer natural. I forced mine because the natural patina was taking too long. Not that it was reacting with the food, I just thought it was too shiny. :)

I hope you love yours as much as I love mine.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:22 pm

I don't know that steel. When dealing with a highly reactive steel I would force a patina with hot vinegar after degreasing with alcohol, just to make sure it won't discolour onions or transmit any taste. With less reactive stuff you may just let time do its work.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:29 pm

One advantage of forcing a patina is you can make it uniform and/or patterned. A natural patina will tend to form quicker and darker where the blade contacts food the most frequently, ie along the edge and toward the tip. A forced patina will look more aesthetically sterile whereas the natural patina will look more organic and uneven.

I have done both, I will continue to do both. You do whatever tickles your fancy.

If you have reason to care about what other think, so people see patina as dirty or unkept. A uniform forced patina would appear more purposeful.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:31 pm

85 <> The benefit of a forced patina is no different than the benefit of a natural patina. Patina is patina. I feel like I'm being punked.

If you need the protection of a patina now, force it. If you do not immediately need said protection, allow it to develop naturally. If you don't want the benefit of patina at all, polish out any patina as it develops.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:50 pm

Try it out for a couple of day and see how it goes.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:32 pm

Melampus and others have remarked that cutting poultry will produce a patina that has a rainbow of blue and purple hues.

Re: to force or not to force

Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:49 pm

Does anyone know how reactive the 52100 steel is?
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