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We have a massive amount of Edge Pro products so we figured it would be good to have a whole section on how to use the machine and what to use on it.
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Re: Tips for the Edge Pro

Tue Oct 23, 2012 7:38 pm

I approached this in a slightly different way. I thought about trying to notch the DMT plates but they seem pretty hard and I just decided the Dremel and I weren't up to it. I made a blank for it just like the EP stones are mounted on.

I got an aluminum flat 1/8" x 2" x 4 feet from Lowe's or Home Depot, about $10. Cut it to length, about 6-5/16". Beveled the ends with a disk sander and roughed the mating surfaces too. Glued the DMT to the home made blank with Gorilla fast set glue. So far so good. I'm thinking about getting some balsa from the hobby shop and making some strops from the left over materials.

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Re: Tips for the Edge Pro

Tue Oct 23, 2012 9:50 pm

Paradox wrote:I approached this in a slightly different way. I thought about trying to notch the DMT plates but they seem pretty hard and I just decided the Dremel and I weren't up to it. I made a blank for it just like the EP stones are mounted on.

I got an aluminum flat 1/8" x 2" x 4 feet from Lowe's or Home Depot, about $10. Cut it to length, about 6-5/16". Beveled the ends with a disk sander and roughed the mating surfaces too. Glued the DMT to the home made blank with Gorilla fast set glue. So far so good. I'm thinking about getting some balsa from the hobby shop and making some strops from the left over materials.

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That is a much better way to do it but my stone set is two stones with abrasive on both sides. One stone with C and XC, the other stone has F and XF. So, gluing would ruin one grit on each stone. :( It looks like you did a great job on that one. :)

Re: Tips for the Edge Pro

Tue Oct 23, 2012 10:32 pm

Thanks. I was really pleased with the way it came out. It works much better too. You can get the DMT 6 inch plates in a single sided version for about $27 ea. I didn't find the practice of using the friction of the EP stone holder to hold in the un-mounted plate to be satisfactory at all. It would slip out on me frequently. I have a Pro model and the stones are held in with spring tension and it just didn't make it for me.

Re: Tips for the Edge Pro

Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:19 pm

Paradox wrote:Thanks. I was really pleased with the way it came out. It works much better too. You can get the DMT 6 inch plates in a single sided version for about $27 ea. I didn't find the practice of using the friction of the EP stone holder to hold in the un-mounted plate to be satisfactory at all. It would slip out on me frequently. I have a Pro model and the stones are held in with spring tension and it just didn't make it for me.


If I find I like using the stone with the EP I may get the coarse or extra coarse single side stone for quick reprofiling. If I do I'll do exactly whatyou did. Even the glue. Gorilla glue is the best in the world. I know that because it is written on the label. :)

Re: Tips for the Edge Pro

Wed Oct 24, 2012 12:02 am

Heh! I don't if it's the best but so far it's doing a good job on this. ;)

Re: Tips for the Edge Pro

Fri Dec 07, 2012 9:26 pm

I have been making these blocks for a couple of years. I like them. They are a big help when first learning to use the EP. Not absolutely needed of course but they make it very easy to keep the knife blade positioned with no movement at all. The only problem (if you want to call it that) is that you usually need a seperate block for each knife with unique spine shapes. They are easy to make but a lot of people have said this is a lot of trouble. After making 2 of 3 they get easy and I can make one for a new knife in less than 5 minutes. This helps for the life of the knife when sharpening. These things may help someone who is having trouble holding the blade still through the entire stroke.

EDGE GUIDE BLOCKS FOR THE EDGE PRO SHARPENER

I made blocks to help hold the blade in one position when sharpening a knife that is small enough to sharpen without sliding the blade along the EP blade table. The blocks will keep the blade from pivoting back and forth when the spine is not flat enough to rest against the edge guide without pivoting.

USING EDGE GUIDE BLOCK FOR EDGE PRO SHARPENER

1. You can see how a knife blade will pivot back and forth on a part of the spine depending on the shape of the blade spine. (pictures 3 and 4) I pictured the pivot way too much just to illustrate the pivot movement. If this pivoting occurs during the sharpening process it could result in the stone hitting the edge of the knife just a little bit different from stroke to stroke. The goal is to have the stone hit the edge exactly the same on every stroke. Since the human being (and me in particular) is prone to error I created what I call “Edge Guide Blocks” (EGB) for my Edge Pro (EP). They should hold the knife blade in the same position all the time. I only use these for blades short enough that you don’t need to slide the blade along the sharpener. I’d say 4” or less blade length.

2. Here is a picture (picture 1) of the EGB on the EP with my knife. I removed the white plastic piece on the guide in the picture with the EGB so it would be easier to see I hope. Once you put the block on the EP you need to adjust the guide so the edge is in the right position on the blade table on the EP. Flip the EGB with the knife when sharpening opposite sides. Picture 2 is of the knife positioned properly without a EGB.

Additional notes:
Keep in mind that when the edge of the knife is moved further from or closer to the very edge of the blade table on the EP it changes the angle slightly that the stone will hit the edge of the blade. This change is very slight but it can be easier to picture it in your mind by thinking of moving the blade all the way down to the bottom of the table. The angle per side would be almost 90 degrees per side. So if you have your knife on the blade table with the edge ¼” off the sharpener you will be hitting the edge at a certain angle. If you then move the blade down the table so the blade edge is right at the end of the table the stone will be hitting the edge at slightly a higher angle. I don't know if it makes enough of a difference to matter. I haven’t done it yet but I’m going to find out just how big a difference it would make. This moving closer and farther away can occur when not using an EGB if the blade pivots on the table.

When possible I place the knife with the handle against the EP. This makes it easy to place the knife the same every time. I make the EGBs to fit the knife in this position when possible.



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TO MAKE AN EDGE GUIDE BLOCK

Place the material you are going to make a block out of under the edge guide and tighten it down. The material is a square or rectangle at this point.

Mark the outline of the edge guide on the material.

Then place the knife on top of the material so the blade edge is positioned parallel with the end of the blade table (or however you want it positioned when you sharpen it). Draw the outline of the blade spine on the material.

Remove the material from the EP and cut out what was under the edge guide and what was under the knife blade.

NOTE: Paint stirrers work well because the wood is soft enough to cut out easily and strong enough to hold the blade in place during sharpening. The blocks in my pictures are made out of vinyl siding I had left over after siding our house. The vinyl siding works good because you can make thin or thicker ones by gluing 2 or 3 together. This would be determined by the thickness of the knife blade. A thin kitchen knife would only need a thin EGB but a camp knife may need an EGB that is 3 times thicker. You don’t want the block thicker than the blade and closer to the tip so you need to cut the material back far enough back from the tip that the stone doesn’t hit the block when sharpening an edge to lower angles.
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