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 Post subject: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2016 3:35 pm 

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2014 1:56 pm
Posts: 1403
Location: Geneva, Ohio
This knife was ordered by GeorgeK, as a gift to his wife.... so she would leave his knives alone!
I haven't met Georges' wife yet, and I'm sure she's a wonderful woman, but I hear she can be a bit rough on knives; cutting on glass plates, etc.
She doesn't read the forums, so I'm not in fear of mine or Georges' safety. :lol:

Being that's Mrs. K can have a slight tendency to be more of a user and not so much a care taker; George was concerned about durability and edge retention.
Tim suggested Duratech 20CV steel. It is a powered metallurgy (PM) steel with 1.9% carbon, 20% Chromium and other ingredients designed for durability and corrosion resistance. Maybe Tim will chime in with some more technical data. ;)

The blade:
Length: 175mm
Height: 36.5mm at heel
Over all weight: 4.32 ounces
Spine-
2.73 @ ferrule
2.54 @ mid
0.35 @ tip


George has the Ikeda AS 250 Gyuto, which is a popular alternative to the Masamoto KS 240, and being that it is his favorite knife he asked Tim to duplicate the Masamotos' profile.
Comparing it to the Masamoto that I currently have that belongs to JBart... I'd say that Tim nailed it!

The profile of the blade makes it a great push or pull slicer, and an excellent chopper!
It's an OK rocker; it's on the tip with the heel about 2" off the board; still able, but doesn't excel here.

The distal taper on this one is insane.
The knife tapers from the spine to the edge, quickly, and is super thin behind the edge, and at the tip.
Using it for the horizontal cuts in dicing onions was almost effortless.
Those of you who participated in the pass-around for Tims' 165 Utility a few months back will understand what I'm trying to convey.
It is 100% performance!

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The finish on the blade works excellently to create food release.
About the only thing that I had issues with was dicing potatoes for home fries, but potatoes get the starchy goo on them and they stick to any thing.
No fault of Tim's work.

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The Handle
The handle is constructed from 2,400 year old Bog Oak from the Ukraine, and Cocobolo.
The Bog Oak is deep and dark, and very similar to African Blackwood, IMO.
The Cocobolo has nice grain and character, but isn't overwhelming, or over done.
Tim used Silver Nickel for the spacers (and pin, Tim?).
The combination of materials and Tims craftsmanship created a very elegant, super comfy handle!
Tim told me a few months ago when we spoke through an email that he was still looking for his style when it came to handles. I'd like to put my vote in and say I hope this is it!

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Performance
I enjoyed this knife a lot more than the 165 Utility that Tim passed around a few months ago.
The extra height of the blade along with some design changes created more room between the board and your knuckles; making it more user friendly for board work.
I have been busy making handles, and other items, as well as tending to my ailing mother.. so I didn't use it as much as I would have liked to.
The items I did use it on were no match.

George took possession of the knife in mid May, and has sharpened it once since.
I sharpened it when I got it from George, and it was far more difficult that I had imagined. The steel is definitely tough, and resistant to the stones. I have never sharpened a HAP40 or some of the steels that are know for being a PiTA, but this one wasn't easy. After about an hour I had it shaving arm hair, push cutting paper, and all that fun stuff. I stopped it to 0.5µm and put it to use.

Like some of the other PM's, it lost its just sharpened edge after a 15 minutes of use, or so. It still retained some of its' crispness, and was still very capable of shaving, etc.
It's now been a week and the edge is still just as good as it was after it's first use.

Tim did an awesome job in designing, and producing a great knife.
This has become my favorite knife in this size/class.

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Great work Tim!
Sorry the review wasn't better written.

Thanks for letting me sharpen your knife George :lol: :lol: :lol:



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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:49 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 9:47 am
Posts: 470
Location: NY
That's a great review! Thank you for taking the time and awesome photos for it!
Glad that you liked it as much as we enjoy it!

BTW my amazing wife has been cutting with it on a daily basis (still...) on ceramic plates for 3 months... No damage or micro-chipping or what so ever! Great toughness and blade performance Tim! Thank you!


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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 5:10 am 

Joined: Wed Sep 04, 2013 9:16 am
Posts: 630
Location: Oxford,MA
thanks for the thoughtful write up ! This is the advantage of outsourcing heat treat to professionals like Peters Heat Treat. They heat treated this blade individually, for a steel like this exact temperature control and quench rate is extremely important. I like bog oak ferrules for that tactile feel, the rugged open grain look kinda grew on me. I really need to try out this steel on some hard use outdoors edc knives, as Im not really sure of its limitations. Although M390 is pretty well documented as great outdoors, and this 20CV stuff is the same recipe.



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Tim Johnson
Oxford, MA
tim@blackstoneknife.com
http://www.blackstoneknife.com
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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 6:35 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 10:39 am
Posts: 1466
Location: Indiana, USA
Nice knife! :)

Ceramic plates, OMG... o.O


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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:59 pm 

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2014 1:56 pm
Posts: 1403
Location: Geneva, Ohio
I wasn't a big fan of the bog oak to tell the truth, but no fault of yours. I didn't care for the open grain, and I know it's inherent of the species. That is the small difference that causes me to buy African Blackwood; especially if it is stabilized.

I'm no metallurgist but I did go through some tool & die courses, and did 75% of the heat treatment of A2 tool steal for plastic injection molds (knob cavities). The temp window was small (1770*f was target temp iirc.. it was 1990!), and the time at temp wasn't too long either. There's surely a science to it! You/we are lucky to have someone to go to like Peters.

Carol.. ur getting ceramic plates for Christmas!



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"Price is what you pay; value is what you get" ~ Unknown
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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:16 pm 

Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 10:39 am
Posts: 1466
Location: Indiana, USA
Could you loan me the Spaz, too, Gopher? I bet it would LOVE those plates! ;)


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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2016 6:49 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 9:47 am
Posts: 470
Location: NY
The plates started scratching after Tim's knife showed up... up to that time the soft cheapies had rolled edges or chips... The Corelle plates are the most scratched ones, Lenox holds better up to now....

Carol when Gopher sends you Spaz, go to Meijer and get a 2lb block of mozzarella, throw it in the freezer for 2 hours, take it out, place it on any glass/ceramic plate and force your way through the mozz. Depending on your angle and how close to the tip your cut is, you would end up with a ko-(130mm), regular (165mm) or long (180+mm) nakiri.... And then Gopher visits you for tea :lol:

Make sure to share a video with the forum! LMAO !


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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2016 6:52 pm 

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2014 1:56 pm
Posts: 1403
Location: Geneva, Ohio
I just noticed while browsing my sub-forum... that I posted this in the wrong place.
Dee Dee Dee!



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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2016 8:27 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 10:39 am
Posts: 1466
Location: Indiana, USA
George, now you have to get some diamond dinner plates. These would have the added benefit of actually sharpening the knife while you are cutting! ;)


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 Post subject: Re: Tim Johnson (Blackstone Knife and Tool) 175 Gyuto
PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2016 9:56 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 9:47 am
Posts: 470
Location: NY
Currently browsing at Atoma's website for 1200 grit diamond dinner plates ... :lol: :lol: :lol:


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