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 Post subject: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 2:39 pm 

Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:48 pm
Posts: 173
Hey everybody, I have a project knife I like to play around with on the stones. I've tried thinning with my bester 500. Just curious if there are stones that might be significantly more efficient with this type of job or if its more a job for a grinder


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 3:00 pm 

Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 2:37 pm
Posts: 68
If someone gives me a western knife that's never been sharpened or thinned, I take out the Atoma 140, then the Atoma 400, then depending on where i want to end up (EP or freehand, etc) I either go to a 320 Nubatama or 500 Shapton Glass. Sounds complex and time consuming but my experience is that it works efficiently and quickly to do that kind of thinning. I would NEVER do that on a good J knife. So part of the answer to that question I suppose depends on the knife, and partly on your budget. Atoma plates as most here would agree are wonderful tools for all kinds of things. Stone flattening is just one of those things.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 4:00 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 955
Atoma 140, Nubatama 150, or anything 220 grit and under will be better for removing lots of steel. A harbor freight 1x30 and some decent belts would be cheaper and more practical though if doing any sort of volume.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 4:18 pm 

Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:48 pm
Posts: 173
No real volume just my own personal knives. The project knife is fujiwara fkm stainless. The rest of my knives are j knives that are a mix of stainless and white carbon. I don't think I'm going to have any major reprofiling although I'm having fun playing around with the wa artifex (fkm steel)


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 4:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:00 pm
Posts: 2478
I think the Nubatama 150 would be a good stone for that job. Your Bester 500 should be a nice fit right from the 150.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 9:42 pm 

Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:00 am
Posts: 678
I've thinned a few knives in my time, I have to say the most efficient way is to start at a low grit or even a lapping plate for that matter, thin the blade behind the edge and then work your way up, it's going to take a lot of attention to detail and time. For this method you have to have a good range of stones otherwise you'll be grinding on your 1k forever trying to get the 140 scratches out. Polishing the scratches out will take a lot of time, I recommend you take a break to give your hands a rest after the low grit stones, when you go back switch to high grit stones to polish up that edge nice!

For most Japanese blades, they are already pretty thin behind the edge, you don't need to go down to something like 140 to thin the edge, a 320 or 500 will cut it quick enough.

A knife that is super hard will be very slippery on the stone when thinning, it's much easier to do it on a softer metal.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:28 am 

Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:40 pm
Posts: 267
the fujiwara steel isn't that hard, and abraides rather well, really I don't think you will need to do all that much thinning, I don't own the wa handled version mark had them make but if its anything like there stock fkm knives they are pretty thin as is. I actually thinned mine from spine to edge a couple years ago, started with 40 grit sandpaper and worked up all the way to 2k. was a very long process and at the end I still didn't get the mirror look I wanted but cutting performance was improved (a bit more sticky though-think I lost most of the convex) you can go at it any way you like but like the rest of the crew stated alow grit diamond plate or one of ken's super low grit stones will save you time (and stone life) in the end. I usually thin everytime I sharpen so it doesent take long and a 4-5 hundred grit stone works fine for me (LUV my latte) good luck and we hope to see some pics of you and your toy in action! Happy sharpening


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 5:24 am 

Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 1:49 am
Posts: 329
Location: Amstelveen, The Netherlands
Is that 40 grit sandpaper perhaps a typo?? My coarsest ever was P120 following the FEPA standard, or are we dealing with different grit systems?


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 12:47 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 955
You can get 36 grit sandpaper too, looks like shards of broken rock glued to paper but they make it.

I would only recommend to the most experienced stones/paper of 100 grit and less. It's difficult to use such coarse stones and can easily damage the knife being worked on. Plus it is more of a last resort option or was mentioned for heavy stock removal, just usually not at the edge.

The fujiwara stainless is fairly soft but will prove rather difficult to sharpen. My typical method was to finish on a 1k then lightly polish on a buffing wheel, or a 1k backbevel and a 3k microbevel. Whatever the method I would not recommend giving the edge too much polish, the steel just can't handle it.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 12:51 pm 

Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:48 pm
Posts: 173
Great advice guys. I'm not too comfortable with thinning yet so I don't do it every time I sharpen or on my better knives. Luckily I use 2 or 3 gyutos regularly so I don't need a full sharpening very often. My kono hh I've had going on 4 months now and I've been able to maintain it with a 5k. I would like to thin my Mac Pro. I've had this a couple years and its never been thinned. Still cuts well bet not like when it was new. Think I should just give it a go with my 500? Also, when u guys thin what do u do with the shoulder. I would think it needs some sort of blending with the bevel and the rest of the blade no?


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