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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:23 pm 

Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2013 5:44 pm
Posts: 633
Chrismit29 wrote:Think I should just give it a go with my 500? Also, when u guys thin what do u do with the shoulder. I would think it needs some sort of blending with the bevel and the rest of the blade no?


The 500 should be fine to start with, just go slow until you are sure how fast or slow it is removing metal from the blade. If you feel like you need to go lower then go lower. As far as the shoulder goes I would knock it down and try to blend it in to convex the edge, but it is really up to you and whether you think it needs it or not. Plus if you have never convexed a cutting edge on a stone before it can take some getting used to as it goes against everything you have taught yourself about holding a consistent angle. lol You essentially have to constantly change the angle to avoid faceting the shoulder with lots of little flat spots. So you are pretty much changing angles WHILE stroking the blade on the stone, not between strokes. I've done it to pretty much every kitchen knife I have ever had and to a few of my pocketknives that would benefit from it, and I still have to take my time with it and think about it while I've got the blade on the stone. I'm thinking the MAC Pro would be a great knife to practice it on though. ;)

You can also cheat a bit when convexing and use a piece of sandpaper on a soft mousepad. The trick here is consistent pressure. The mousepad gives to the pressure (similar to an unsupported section of belt on a belt sander) and will give you a natural curve. Too much pressure though and the sandpaper can grind off your edge if it wraps around it (again like a belt sander). You want just enough pressure to bend the sandpaper around the shoulder while keeping the edge off of the abrasive.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:28 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:00 pm
Posts: 2389
Good explanation Def. Just take your time, look closely at your edge frequently to monitor your progress and try not to hit the edge of the edge while thinning. Use sharpie as needed, repeatedly if necessary to assist you as you thin the blade.


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:34 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4210
I'm sure a 500 will work fine for you now but once you get a little more experience under your belt thinning with a 500 will drive you nuts.



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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 5:24 am 

Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:40 pm
Posts: 264
ya 40 grit was no typo, like I mentioned my goal was to thin the entire blade, was just for fun as it only to see If I noticed a dramatic improvement in performance. I am in the industry and at the time I was the banq production sous chef, my knives see a regular beating and anything to make the flow through an ingredient easier was more than welcome, I felt like it was a 8hr investment to an 80$ knife to bring its cutting performance up to the 180 $ range.
I haven't had a lot of trouble getting the steel in the fkm range sharp, but it does take some time, it doesn't really benefit from more than 4k in my opinion, but ive put it through some high grit naturals and it likes the polish but doesn't hold on to it,
back to thinning, +1 to what jeff mentioned, just go slow to start and do little by little. as soon as u learn to do it every time you sharpen it will be second nature and u wont need to worry about using a super low grit stone. just what ever one u gonna start sharpening on thin on it first :)


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:19 am 

Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 1:49 am
Posts: 312
Location: Amstelveen, The Netherlands
Thanks Cheffiec!


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 Post subject: Re: Thinning stone
PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 4:31 am 

Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:40 pm
Posts: 264
np Benuser, any time ;)


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