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 Post subject: Switching to stones from edge pro
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7501
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Hi Mark:

I have a Richmond Artifex 240mm, a couple of Tojiro knives (DP) with VG-10 steel, plus a Miyabi 7000MC utility knife (which I believe is made with ZDP-189 steel). The Miyabi, once it gets dull, is difficult to resharpen to a satisfactory edge. I have a traditional metal sharpening steel and a ceramic rod. I have tried the edge pro system, but think with a bit of practice that a set of stones would give the best results.

Given the variety of steels, what type/brand of sharpening stones would you recommend?

Thanks, Bill



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 Post subject: Re: Switching to stones from edge pro
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:20 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7501
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Hi Bill,

I made the same transition just because I found free hand sharpening more fun.

I would recommend you get a base starter set that includes a rough, middle and fine stone. The steels in your particular knives are all relatively easy so most of the stones we sell can sharpen them well.

For pure ease I like the shapton glass stones. They're flat, splash and go and produce very good results: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/sh6pcstset.html

This set has 3 very popular stone in it and is our best selling set on the site. It has everything you need including holder, flattener and a few useful accessories that come in handy when you sharpen:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/knshcoset.html

Come back and ask follow up questions if you have them especially after you practice a few times and we'll help you.



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 Post subject: Re: Switching to stones from edge pro
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:14 pm 

Joined: Fri May 11, 2012 12:17 am
Posts: 132
Marks advice is spot on..I like to start with a diamond plate, or something comparable in coarseness and cutting ability. Then move to a 400 then 1000 then strop with green Enkay compound. I don`t have time anymore to mess around with my first stone when setting the bevel or chips.


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 Post subject: Re: Switching to stones from edge pro
PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2013 3:27 pm 

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 10:01 pm
Posts: 203
Jigs are for dancing, stones are for sharpening. Congrats on the switch, stick with it and enjoy the learning process. You just can't beat the level of precision and control you can get with your own 2 hands. The other thing you'll learn is that technique trumps product every time. Once you gain technique you can get results nomatter what the brand, stone, etc. I do agree that having a course stone saves much elbow grease.

Josh


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 Post subject: Re: Switching to stones from edge pro
PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2013 11:16 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 3974
Location: Kentucky
Excellent 3 stone set up and splash-n-go. Will sharpen anything you have. http://www.chefknivestogo.com/shpro3pcset.html



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 Post subject: Re: Switching to stones from edge pro
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:51 am 

Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 11:14 am
Posts: 188
Location: Florida, USA, Earth
The statement that technique trumps the tool is 100% spot on IMO. I'm no expert sharpener but I've found that to be true with about any skill or hobby. My guitar sounds like a different instrument in the hands of someone who really knows how to play. :) I believe regarding sharpening this is true when using stones or the EP. My preferred progression is to use the EP for profiling an edge and then finishing the edge with bench stones. I could get a crisper edge using bench stones and very light strokes on the last 5 strokes or so. Then I decided to experiment and practice using the EP for everything. I have a set of Shapton glass stones for the EP from 500 - 16k and after practicing and paying VERY close attention to using light strokes just like on bench stones I've been able to get super smooth, very sharp edges using only the EP and even stropping with it. I have 4 or 5 balsa strops for the EP with a variety of grits of sprays. I also have some nano-cloth and roo strops for the EP and they will do just a good a job using the EP as they do on a bench stone. IMO the EP is a great tool and capable of providing the superior results some crave and strive for. It's just amatter or forcing yourself to use it with the same dedication people use to master bench stones. It's the technique that is the determining factor. I believe the key for finishing an edge no matter if you use an EP or other "system" or if you use bench stones is to use extremely light strokes. I've been hearing the very experienced folks say this for years but it wasn't until recently that my hard head realized it.

Having said all that I prefer to use bench stones for finishing an edge. With the EP I like to profile the edge with a known angle that is consistant. This is one area I have not forced myself to become better at. That will probably be my next project. If I ever decide to develope more skill using bench stones only I'll put an bevel at a known angle with the EP then try to keep the bevel as flat as I can and at the same angle using bench stones. Ive done this a time or two and when the bevel is flat it's easy to feel the flat spot on the stone. However, after a few strokes the bevel is getting convexed and I can't feel the flat spot and have to keep the angle consistant on my own. I think that starting with a "known" and trying to duplicate it or maintain it is a good training method in a lot of skills. Of course I'm very new to getting edges really sharp so my opinions about things change quickly.

Jack


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