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Re: Supper steels (rods)

Thu Aug 30, 2012 9:18 am

A good quality steel (rod)will prolong a super sharp edge on edge-ware ,Provided they are used properly. Not those ones that look like they could sharpen a chain saw, a fine smoother one that will straighten and enhance the edge not wipe it off. Most steels sold by the knife companies are rough and only make a knife feel sharper to someone who hasn't got good sharpening skills. So most people that do do know how to put a keen edge on a knife take a look at these rough steels (rods) and say " I'm not putting my blade any where near that thing". Once you know how to use them they are a real asset.

Re: Supper steels (rods)

Mon Sep 10, 2012 3:49 pm

These steels look great. I would definitely be interested in one if I didn't already own a ~40 year old worn in butcher's steel myself...

I think the non-straight rod my be something that came about to make it easier to steel without having to adjust your angle as you go down the blade. Assuming you steel from heel to tip?

Re: Supper steels (rods)

Fri Sep 14, 2012 3:24 am

T Van Kempen wrote:They are a reproduction of a very old English steel .Williams. Smithfeild. London. Also known as a Pipe steel, Very sought after in the meat industry. But the most popular ones are the straight ones. The pipes are popular amongst the people that know or have heard about them through stories past down through the years. Original pipes command prices in the range of between 4 and 6 maybe 700 dollars on auction sites.


One of my work colleagues collects steels. I'll pass on your contact details to her. And yes - she's always on the lookout for Pipes.

There were also Pipe brand knives - probably the most famous of which was the one Harry Wolhuter used to kill a lion that was mauling him http://www.kimwolhuter.com/harry.htm
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