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Suggestion for stone line

Sat Jul 14, 2012 7:47 pm

Howdy,

I am carefully transitioning away from my Norton water stones and would like a suggestion. I am happy with the Nortons (for what they are worth) but want to add some more options. My main use is woodworking, often sharpening plane irons with a guide, and hence prone to unevenly beating on the stone.

I'd like a suggestion for a line of rather hard stones that I can safely leave in water 3-4 hours at a time and that can take a good beating once I put them to work.

Naniwa Super Stones / Shapton Pros / Chosera / Nubatamas? Suggestions? Comments? Threats?

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Sun Jul 15, 2012 12:17 am

Is there a reasone you want to leave them in water for a few hours at a time vs using say a Shapton Pro stone and just splashing it with water right before you sharpen with it?

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Sun Jul 15, 2012 1:58 am

No reason other than having to break an old habit. You make it sound like it's a habit worth breaking.

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Sun Jul 15, 2012 8:15 pm

YES

Shapton Pros are made for woodworking tools and do the job fabulously.

What's your budget?

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Mon Jul 16, 2012 1:31 am

Considering I just got the 15K from Mark a few days ago, and I won't spring for a 30K until Mark breaks one by mistake and offers it severely reduced, hit me with a suggestion that will not have excessive redundancy. Budget is sorta my hobby money: unlimited, but a little at a time. So if it takes a week or a month to buy a set of stones, so be it . . . my guess is 4 or 5 stones should do it.

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Mon Jul 16, 2012 3:28 pm

The stones are exactly what you are looking for--they are hard, fast, don't need soaking, made to work with each other, and designed for woodworking tools. The low grit ones are really terrible to use, I don't like them below the 1k, but I do really like the 1k--it's very fast. If you damage your tools a lot(chips, worn profiles, dents in the edge, etc), you'll need the 1k, but if you just sharpen then correctly when they are dull, you can forego it, the 2k is pretty aggressive. If I were you, I'd get the 2k and 5k to go with the 15k that you have coming, and then make myself a leather strop. I would not charge the strop with any kind of compound or spray, but if you do, make it very very small, at least .25 microns.

I normally don't emphasize the size of the spray you use, but not only are you using tools that benefit from a very high level of polish, but coming off the Shapton Pro 15k, you are already just a hair under 1 micron in particle size, and if you don't leave enough of a gap you run the risk of over stropping. I'd leave the strop bare, honestly. But I don't think any freehand sharpening should be done without stropping on something.

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Tue Jul 17, 2012 5:39 pm

I love my Shapton Pro stones, and recommend them to anyone. You don't ever want to leave Shapton Pro stones soaking in water for three or four hours, however, because leaving a Shapton Pro in water for even thirty minutes can ruin the stone.

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Wed Jul 18, 2012 1:19 am

Sounds like Shapton Pro it is. Thanks to everyone for the help. As soon as I am back from vacation in a few days, I'll order some. Don't want the mailman to be tempted by them while holding on to my mail :)

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:29 am

wm_crash wrote:Sounds like Shapton Pro it is. Thanks to everyone for the help. As soon as I am back from vacation in a few days, I'll order some. Don't want the mailman to be tempted by them while holding on to my mail :)

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan



I don't really see anything in this thread to support that decision.

Re: Suggestion for stone line

Wed Jul 18, 2012 6:26 am

Of course, this isn't any sort of in depth review of sharpening stones and their fitness for woodworking tools. It's the honest advice of three folks on the forum. If your opinion differs, I have an open mind and I'd like to hear it.

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan
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