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Stone Set.

Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:07 am

Hey folks,

So a while ago I was looking for a stone set/strop set, but I never got around to purchasing either of them due to financial limitations...That time has passed and I'm loading up the shopping cart with goodies now. I've been trying to sharpen on a decrepit Tri-Stone Sharpener we have lying in the corner at work collecting dust but with limited success...I think it's time for some real stones.

Melampus advised me on a strop set and stone set, I'm going to buy the strop but the stones he suggested are no longer available...so I'm looking for others.

I'm thinking something like this...

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/shgl50set.html

But maybe I'll be better off with something else? Are certain stones less forgiving to the skills of a newbie than others? I'll be re-watching the sharpening videos on the site to see if I can improve my technique outside of actual practice but it comes down to putting some hours in on the stones themselves.

Anyways, I always appreciate the feedback I receive here...Thanks in advance folks.

Re: Stone Set.

Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:20 pm

The GlassStone's are well regarded by many people I trust. However, they never agreed with me. I liked other stone's better for the feel they gave me.

I will note that the GlassStone's are very hard and if you wobble at all I've found very hard stone's to be less forgiving. However, the advantage to that is you learn not to wobble REALLY fast. :)

If I were to get a set of stone's today, it would be one that contained:

DMT XXC for serious repairs and flattening (or Atoma if budget allowed)
400 Latte
Nubatama Ume 1,000
Suehiro Rika

If you wanted a finer polishing stone, I'd get the Takenoko maybe.

Re: Stone Set.

Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:46 pm

If I were to get a set of stones from CKtG today:

400 Latte
1200 Bester
5000 Rika
Arashyama/Takenoko

But a King 800 (@$25 elsewhere) is a MUST have for kasumi finishes.

Mowgs

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 1:45 am

I had a set of glass stones. I still use the GS 1000. I was not such a fan of the higher grit glass stones.

Now my primary set is:
Beston 500
Bester 1200
Rika 5000

I really like this progression. Plus, it is a relative bargain.

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:49 am

My current progression a the 320, 1k, and 5k Shapton pro. I'm really liking these stones, they cut very fast and work well on all steels. I want to try some Glass Stones next but will be taking Shaptons recommendations of the 500 and 2k, they recommend it with nearly every set so it must be for good reason.

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:02 am

Jason B. wrote:My current progression a the 320, 1k, and 5k Shapton pro. I'm really liking these stones, they cut very fast and work well on all steels. I want to try some Glass Stones next but will be taking Shaptons recommendations of the 500 and 2k, they recommend it with nearly every set so it must be for good reason.

I've been an advocate of the Shapton Pros for a long time.

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:01 am

So bear in mind that ANY of the suggestions here will be WAY better than a trihone.

"Are certain stones less forgiving to the skills of a newbie than others?"

Absolutely. So very hard stones for instance the Shapton Glassstones and the Pro stones which I've used for almost 10 years now, are quite hard and give relatively poor feedback. Because they are hard, they are precise so if you are off a bit in terms of angle consistency, they will work against you. They will force you to be more precise to get good results that can be obtained more easily with a softer stone. A beginner will appreciate more feedback and lower precision requirements.

Going in the other direction, real soft stones are easy to cut into on edge leading strokes. This would include many of the Naniwa superstones and the 1200 Nubatama Bamboo for instance. While these have their uses they are not beginner stones.

Also stones that cut relatively slowly are frustrating to use - less rewarding and require more strokes to accomplish the same thing. I'm thinking of King stones.

I've also given the matter of a coarse stone for newbies some thought. At first I used to think 'Don't give a newbie something too aggressive - they will trash their knives'. Then I saw what newbies ACTUALLY sharpen - VERY dull chipped knives, soft knives, knives that have had the crap beat out of them and may be getting sharpened the first time in their miserable lives. For this you NEED something aggressive or else you never actually get to making an edge, let alone refining it. You want results and some gratification or you will say the hell with this.

Enter the new Nubatama Combo stone A THICK 150 grit side - the same stone as the big 150 brick coupled with a NEW 1200 grit stone. Not the soft 1200 Nubatama but a relatively hard stone much like the (pricey but nice) 1000 Nubatama white or platinum stone. Unlike the Shaptons, this stone as well as the speckled 1k Nubatama Ume, will give you excellent feedback, something a newbie will appreciate and more easily get good edges using.

This is IMHO a perfect Newbie stone and one that will fit into a larger set later on. Although it is a bigger jump following this with the 5k Nubatama Bamboo, it makes for an excellent 2 stone solution. If you wish the 2k Nubatama speckled Bamboo can be added as a bridge between the 1200 of the combo stone and the 5k. You can also add the 320 or 400 Nubatama at the other end between the 150 bamboo and the 1200, but again for most knives newbies will be sharpening this is unnecessary. You can also use the Nubatama combo stone followed by a natural stone like the Aoto. A sweet setup.

---
Ken

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:07 pm

I started with the Shapton Pros as a beginner and had no problem with them working against me. Very good stones that you won't grow out of.

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:34 pm

Jeff B wrote:I started with the Shapton Pros as a beginner and had no problem with them working against me. Very good stones that you won't grow out of.


+1

Wish I would have started with them, would have saved me a lot of money... maybe.

I was always a fan of harder stones using Arkansas stones, spyderco ceramics, and diamond hones. When I started using waterstones I went the direction of soft and muddy because that's what I read was best for knives while harder stones were for chisels. After experiencing Shapton and Chosera I have no plans to go back, except for my Arashiyama and green brick ;)

Re: Stone Set.

Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:48 pm

I started with a 1k and 4k Shapton GS stones with the generic lapping plate. I got decent results with it. Or I thought I was getting decent results with it. It was nicer than the cheap tri hone I had before...

I got a green brick on a the forum only sale and and started feeling what a stone should feel like. I took a loupe and looked at my edges more often to find that one burr in a spot and I still use a magic on stubborn edges to make sure I'm hitting what I'm wanting to hit.

Now I'm producing great edges. The Shapton glass stones are nice. You can feel the edge get smoother as you progress but it is much more subtle that some other stones. I won't be getting rid of my Shapton's. They work well and while the desire to buy more stones is out there (darn naturals and Nubatamas), I won't for a while. My 1k, Greenbrick, 4k, steer hide is doing some great stuff. (The greenbrick is amazing to finish german/french knives on fwiw)
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