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Re: Starting on stones with a chef choice trizor edge

Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:49 pm

No.

Some stone's (Referred to as "Splash and Go" stones) do not need soaking at all.

Other stone's that require soaking do not bubble....typically the finer the stone, the less likely you are to see it bubble.

The Rika, for instance, doesn't bubble much as I recall. It needs soaked until you can take it out and the surface doesn't go dry almost instantly. Or until you can drip water on the surface and it stays for a bit. That indicates that the stone is saturated and ready to use.

Re: Starting on stones with a chef choice trizor edge

Fri Aug 02, 2013 7:43 am

CHRIS <> I understand your point regarding the 500. Look... if you are uncomfortable with your skills, I unlike everyone else here STRONGLY recommend you not touch that 500. You can accidentally do some serious reprofiling, really quickly, with that stone. Your 1200 is more than capable of cutting enough steel to do the same work that 500 does, but it will do it much more gradually... slowly. Get comfortable on the 1200, and when your sharpie trick & unmarred blade road is proving you consistent then you can graduate to the much more aggressive 500. Remember, all it does is speed things up, but it can screw things up that much more quickly, as well!

Re: Starting on stones with a chef choice trizor edge

Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:18 pm

I don't not share Mel's advice about the 500 and a newbie....but I'd prefer that over the Chef's Choice option.

Just to be clear and all. :)

Re: Starting on stones with a chef choice trizor edge

Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:50 pm

The best advice i can give is put the Chef's Choice in the yard sale pile, grab your stones, an old knife you car little about and practice, practice and practice some more.

Re: Starting on stones with a chef choice trizor edge

Tue Aug 06, 2013 2:50 am

"The Chef's Choice is a poor choice".

Re: Starting on stones with a chef choice trizor edge

Tue Aug 06, 2013 5:08 pm

Chris, forget about the machines and jigs. Not only will you save money, there are few things in life that bring as much satisfaction as laying steel to stone and producing an edge without any aids, other than your own two hands. I used to own many of the popular devices, and I've sold every last one of them. Invest yourself in learning the art and you won't be disappointed.

Josh
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