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Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Sun Oct 27, 2013 1:04 pm

What sort of knife would you guys recommend for splitting open spaghetti squash? Currently, I use an old Henckle chef knife. I take a big swing and get it wedged in good. Then I pick up the whole thing and bang it on the counter until it's through, like if a splitting maul got stuck in a log. It works sort of, plus it adds danger and excitement to my otherwise peaceful life.

So I'm thinking I need a special knife for this job. Am I going to have more success with a super thin blade that is crazy sharp and can slice through the rind with minimal wedging, or do I want something more like a small axe?

Here's my answers to the questions.
1. Are you right handed? Yes
2. What type of knife are you interested in (gyuto, nakiri etc..) That's kind of my question.
3. What size knife are you looking for? Also, my question, but I'm not afraid of a large knife.
4. Do you prefer carbon or stainless steel? No preference.
5. Do you prefer a western handle or a Japanese handle? No Preference.
6. How much did you want to spend? Nothing in mind. Probably wouldn't go over a few hundred, but don't let that limit the feedback.
7. Do you know how to sharpen? I've sharpened woodworking tools for years, and I've run between 50 and 100 knives through my EdgePro, so I'm beginning to.

Thanks for any advice,

Mike

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Sun Oct 27, 2013 1:12 pm

I think the Tojiro western deba would be a good knife for this task. It's not thin but it is sharp and has some weight behind it. http://www.chefknivestogo.com/todpwede21.html

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 3:28 am

Use a thin, sharp knife and proper technique to split spaghetti squash. Cut the ends off so you can stand the squash on end, and then push cut through it lengthwise. I use a Tadatsuna wa-gyuto, but a Sakai Yusuke wa-gyuto or other thin knife will work as well. A thick heavy knife just wedges, as you've said.

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:01 am

Thanks for the suggestions. I tried my wife's nakiri today, and it was so much easier. I expect if I do that to it much, I'll be sharpening it pretty often.

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:21 am

Which Nakiri did you try? Nakiri's work great for foods like that and my Tanaka Sekiso gyuto 240mm works very very well; it has a great grind on it and goes smoothly thru sweet potatoes. With a gyuto, I find it works best if I push the knife forward as well as down at the same time instead of just straight down. Nakiri's work well, but are sometimes a bit small feeling. The Kohetsu 210mm gyuto I got to play with did awesome in sweet potatoes.

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:38 am

She's got the Dojo Hayashi 165. Super cheap and holy cow it gets good and sharp.

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:49 am

LOL, yeah, those suckers are thin and take an awesome edge!! I would look at a thin gyuto, like a Kono, Kohetsu or the Tanaka Sekiso. The Sekiso is thicker, but the grind is flat out awesome on it, all carbon blade though.

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 1:18 pm

I don't know if I'd buy a special knife just for this one task. If you don't already have a nice sujihiki (slicer) I'd go for that.

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/fufkmsu27.html

Good, entry level suji.

To pretty expensive and amazing:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/suinhowa27.html

There are several in between of course.

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 6:12 pm

Adam Marr wrote:"I don't know if I'd buy a special knife just for this one task."

I didn't know how to say it, but you must be eating a whole lotta Spaghetti Squash to wanna drop "a few hundered dollars [$300]" on a knife just for them. ;)

Re: Spaghetti Squash Splitter

Mon Oct 28, 2013 6:47 pm

As long as we're on the subject, Melampus how would you prepare Spaghetti Squash?

At home, we leave them whole, poke a few holes in 'em w/a fork and microwave until tender. At that point, any good knife will easily halve the cooked squash and away we go with a fork to extract the flesh.
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