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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 6:14 pm 

Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 6:20 am
Posts: 2109
Stand. I sometimes sit for straights, having the stone above my elbows lightens my touch a bit...or so it seems to me. I could never do a knife that way. I pivot about my waist as part of my motion, both to initiate movement on the stone and to create clearance for my elbows to follow through unimpeded.


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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 7:02 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:10 pm
Posts: 130
I am 6'3" and I find it most comfortable to stand at the kitchen counter with my stones and holder on a tool box, about 10" high (including the stone height). The same box I store my stones for travel.
I find it easier to hold a constant angle if my wrists are close to level with my elbows.
Plus, I feel more comfortable to change up my techniques.
But mostly, I like to have my eyes good and close to the operation and, frankly, I am getting to old to bend over for hours at a time.


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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 7:15 pm 

Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:57 pm
Posts: 600
I generally stand at a countertop next to the sink, with the stone laying flat on a towel. I plant my feet in place but I do use my waist to assist in the motion of my arms, like cedarhouse describes, so I feel standing gives me better freedom of motion. I have found that any sort of motion located in my forearms or even my shoulders to some extent wants to turn my wrists and therefore tilt the knife. I have gotten the most consistent angles by transitioning as much as possible to core muscle groups.


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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 8:35 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2013 9:48 pm
Posts: 87
+1 on the standing/whole body approach as described by jmcnelly85 and Melampus. After using a Tojiro sink bridge for a bit, I built a bridge for my kitchen sink from scrap lumber in my shop. Gets the height correct, and allows me to simply place the stone or stone holder (Shapton Glass) on a damp rag on the wood top. Very quick for switching stones. A plastic tub in the sink with water keeps me from needing to run the faucet all the time. As I finish with a stone, I flatten/rinse, then set it in the dish drainer to dry (allows full air circulation, which is both quicker and less likely to cause uneven drying).


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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 8:59 pm 
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Location: USA... mostly.
MadRookie wrote: "I sit." :)


But you sharpen on an EdgePro, correct?



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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 10:48 pm 

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2013 11:00 pm
Posts: 37
I do both, but reading this thread is making me think that my recent poor results with waterstones might be because I've been sitting when using them. I've gotten really excellent results with DMT plates while standing.

Ken's words are almost exactly how I would have described my standing technique: I try to minimize joint movement, making my body a "platform to hold the knife in place". Then I just rock my body back and forth and the angle seems to stay pretty constant.

I've used the Work Sharp Ken Onion both seated and standing and seem to get similar results both ways, but thinking back on it, I enjoy it more when I'm standing as I feel like I have more freedom of motion.

I'm really glad I this thread came up. My next few blades will be done standing.

Brian.


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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 10:59 pm 
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Just a handy trick while we are discussing this for freehand sharpeners. If you have an overhead light (ceiling light for instance), look at where the light reflects off of the knife - what it lands on etc. If you maintain a consistent angle the reflection doesn't move much at all. If you wobble a lot the reflection is going all over. Keep the reflection consistent.

---
Ken



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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 1:20 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:10 pm
Posts: 130
Great idea Ken.
I have been using a similar technique by watching the shadow of the knife on the stone from my overhead light.
It has been working well, but it sounds like your method would be much more accurate.


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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 1:39 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4612
I sharpen on a sink bridge over my sink, very convenient and less mess. Like others, I couldn't image trying to do it sitting.



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 Post subject: Re: Sharpening - Standing up vs. Sitting Down
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 2:35 am 

Joined: Thu Mar 21, 2013 7:06 pm
Posts: 229
Used to stand, but have been sitting while sharpening for probably a year or so now. Can still fix my arms and mostly rotate through at the waist, have gotten very good results. Got tired of working up a sweat sharpening on the sink bridge, tried sitting a few times and didn't find it too much of an adaptation. Come to think of it, I probably switched over when I started honing straights. Just started feeling more and more natural, and felt like I had better control over pressure used. And I took on some wisdom from this guy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCayJPiZgz4


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