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Re: Prison Knives

Wed Feb 06, 2013 4:29 pm

I have a friend that does ministry stuff to prisoners and I'm going to talk to him to see if I can get a contact locally that could give me some more feedback.

Re: Prison Knives

Wed Feb 06, 2013 4:46 pm

I have opened a few restaurants for airports and they have similar requirement. Not the blunt tip, but hole in the handle. They literally chain their knives to their workstations. Most I have seen just drill a hole through the butt of their Dexters, but to have one already made specifically for this task I think reaches a larger audience than just correctional facilities.

Re: Prison Knives

Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:16 am

MARK <> CHA CHING... $ $ $ $ $ ;)

Re: Prison Knives

Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:55 am

Don't forget to create a custom chain to hold the knives down. For inspiration, go to your local wide range electronics dealer, and attempt to remove a compact portable speaker system from the shelves.

Re: Prison Knives

Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:28 am

Man, I'm relieved...I thought you were starting a line of shivs! :twisted: :lol:

Re: Prison Knives

Thu Feb 07, 2013 12:24 pm

:lol: :mrgreen: :lol: :mrgreen: :lol:

Re: Prison Knives

Thu Feb 07, 2013 10:36 pm

Ah, don't call it the Richmond shiv :) Maybe the Richmond Warden or Richmond Pardon depending on whether you are marketing to the prisoners or the 'management'.

You might also want to check with Tojiro who also make the colored plastic handled knives - they might already have an NSF rating.

Would a heavy duty nakiri shape do the trick?

Could also be a good aftermarket when they get out if they like it to work in a cafeteria, etc when they are on parole :)

Go for it Mark. This sounds like a good spot. Who would be your competition?

I've recommended those Mac knives for teaching kids to cook - a safety knife.

Another 'niche' would be knives for handicapped.

Mark, you're such an incubator for innovation!

---
Ken

Re: Prison Knives

Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:59 am

The knives used in our prison have holes drilled thru the butt of their full tang handles for chaining to a "knife-rail" via a small welded-shut D-shackle. There is no stipulation that they be blunt tipped. Not sure of the brand(s) but the knives are not high quality and going by the performance of the steel I would guess the blades are made of something equivalent to 440A. If blunt tips are a must then this would be easy enough to achieve on a beltgrinder.

Inmates consider working in the kitchen to be a privilege so there have been no major incidents there in the 10 years the jail has been in operation. Most of the violations have involved trying to smuggle high value food items (coffee; eggs & cheese) back to the accommodation units.

BTW - None of these knives would even approach what I consider to be sharp - not surprising as most of them are used directly on SS benchtops. They are now so worn that it would be cheaper to replace them than to repair them.

Re: Prison Knives

Tue Feb 12, 2013 6:18 am

worn huh? i'd say include a sharpening service as well.

Re: Prison Knives

Tue Feb 12, 2013 1:29 pm

franzb69 wrote:worn huh? i'd say include a sharpening service as well.


I sincerely hope not.

The 'professional service' they contracted to 'sharpen' our 911 Rescue knives stuffed them up something horrid. The day after they'd been 'sharpened' the Mgr responsible asked me what I thought. I opened the 911 I'd been issued that morning, hooked it over the last joint of my left little finger, yanked on it, held it up with the 911 dangling and said "Look - no blood". Damn thing should have left me looking like a Yakuza soldier who'd just made amends to his boss.

I'd offered my services free to sharpen the 911s (and the kitchen knives) but the bosses weren't interested - and now neither am I - even if they offer to pay me. Sharpening the 911s before they got butchered would have been straightforward. Now I'd have to take off too much steel with no guarantee the reshaped blades would perform the way they're supposed to and I'm not willing to wear the consequences of someone else's incompetence.
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