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 Post subject: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 1:11 pm 

Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:48 pm
Posts: 165
Looking for experienced sharpeners comments here. I read a topic on another site that was talking about when you put pressure on your sharpening stroke. I was under the impression you have pressure on the edge leading and trailing stroke. The consensus of the articlei read was that there is more success with pressure only on the edge trailing stroke. What are people's thoughts on this? Do I need to change my approach?


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 5:53 pm 

Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 461
My thought is that article is incorrect, you should apply pressure on the edge leading stroke and decrease it on the edge trailing. The only time there is any pressure at all on the trailing stroke is when you are stropping the knife and this is "weight of the knife" pressure.

If you sharpen quickly it is a little tricky to press while pushing and release while pulling the blade but that is what I strive for.

So pressure on edge leading only.

Peter


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 6:47 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 781
The Japanese method is to only push on the edge trailing stroke. I understand this method and employ it on some types of sharpening but for most every sharpening I keep equal pressure on for and aft strokes.


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 7:26 pm 

Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:51 am
Posts: 24
The Korin sharpening DVD I bought along with my Tojiro several years ago insists that pressure on edge trailing is the only way. This is contrary to every sharpening video I've seen from Mark or Shaun, or even Murray Carter. Not really sure who to go with...


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 7:42 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 3379
Which only goes to show that there is always more than one way to get it done!



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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 8:07 pm 

Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 461
This is why I love these forums. I've always strived to apply pressure on leading strokes only and I'm excited to try it the other way now. I'm grateful to those who teach me so much here.
I just happen to have a dull Shun that needs some attention.....I'm going in.


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 8:29 pm 

Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 461
I think the important thing to take away here is to realize as Jeff indicates that there is no one way, there is "your way" and don't get thrown off by articles or folks like me who sometimes are just plain wrong.


Now having said that I just sharpened a Shun petty with pressure on my trailing strokes only. I was actually quite surprised at how natural it felt, I was expecting it to be like learning to sharpen with my other hand.
I was also thinking that raising the burr would be harder. I was absolutely incorrect, the knife became very sharp, very quickly. In fact, it's one of the sharpest Shun knives I've ever done and that is a lot of Shuns

Maybe I got lucky, I only did one knife, however I will definitely be trying this again.

Chrismit thank you for asking the question and thanks to those who responded.


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 8:40 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:14 am
Posts: 525
Location: San Ramon Ca.
I probably go with more pressure on the trailing stroke. I try to stay fairly even pressure wise but I'm sure thats not always the case. Whatever works for you on a given knife is the way to go for sure. Keeping your elbow even with your wrist is more important.



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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 9:22 pm 

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 10:01 pm
Posts: 203
More pressure on the edge trailing for me, but that's because I adopted the Japanese approach from the very beginning. I use both hands so the edge is always facing me. The other part is learning how to constantly modulate that pressure until you're using the very lightest, yet controlled touch on the finish stones. When you're dealing with an skill set that can be defined on a microscopic level, it's amazing how simple sharpening can be, yet extremely complex at the same time. -Josh


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 Post subject: Re: Pressure on your sharpening stroke?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:11 pm
Posts: 250
Location: NE
Light pressure is applied on edge leading strokes and moderate pressure applied during edge trailing strokes.
I continue this method until the burr is formed or the apex is reached.

I will deburr with the stone using lateral sweeps parallel with the knife. It's pretty much done in the same manner that Ken Schwartz demonstrates in his sharpening videos. Using the weight if the knife, I deburr from heel to tip with a motion that also includes a slight edge leading motion to prevent "stretching" the burr and chasing it to the other side. Similar to the motion used with honing rods. I feel it cleans up the edge better and (for me) I can hold a more consistent angle with this approach. And I continue this motion to create a micro bevel.


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