It is currently Mon Oct 20, 2014 11:58 am

All times are UTC



Welcome
Welcome to chefknivestogo

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!





 Page 2 of 4 [ 37 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 12:27 pm 

Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 1:36 pm
Posts: 277
Location: NY, NY; New Haven, CT
I have the usual kinds of stuff: Staub dutch oven, lodge skillet, plenty of all-clad (d5, tri-ply, and copper-core), nordic wear baking sheets, and the occasional one-off odd stuff, such as a W-S roaster that is huge, tri-ply and built like a tank (for $65).

While I love the results of cast-iron and blue steel, I'm a HUGE fan of all-clad d5 cookware. I'm amazed at how different it is than try-ply, and it makes me wonder what Demeyere might be like for those people who own it. I love that d5 is still very light and super easy to maintain, but often holds lower heat very evenly with excellent control—better than copper (it does not heat as fast or cool as slow as copper, though, which has its downsides); I also think the geometry of most of these pieces is fantastic, especially pans like the 2qt saucier, which is magical. I'll also praise my Staub over Le Creuset. I prefer the Staub for everything except soups. The lids in particular are amazing—you really notice the difference when braising in the oven.

If I did all the dishes myself and had two or three no-soap sinks, I'd probably invest more in plain cast-iron and carbon steel. But for sheer versatility and easy-off use on and off the cooktop, I love the d5 and recommend it all the time. Plus, you can get it at deep discount at TJ-Max and twice a year at major stock sales at W-S, which is great. Just got another $170 2qt d5 saucier for $65 at TJ-Max yesterday, in fact...it is my GF's favorite pan, so now she has one of her own. :)



_________________
~Joe
Ownership experience: Konosuke, Masamoto, Tojiro, Wusthof, Henckels, etc.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 2:56 pm 

Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 12:22 am
Posts: 101
When we got an induction range top (a topic for another discussion) we replaced over a dozen pot's and pans that didn't have a ferrous base. After two years, my most used pans are DeBuyer. Two large Le Crueset Ductch ovens see a lot of range top to oven duty, and three or four no-particular-brand stock pots get a lot of use for soups, boiling water and stocks.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 2:58 pm 

Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 12:22 am
Posts: 101
The only complaint I have with De Buyer is they warp. No doubt, it's my fault, but they still see daily use.

Calphalon, All Clad and other ferrous based pans don't seem to brown foods as well.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 7:29 pm 

Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 12:25 pm
Posts: 329
My 11" De Buyer sauté pan has become my go to steel/cast iron pan for everything except cooking acidic tomato type sauces. Thank you Phillysco for the recommendation from the previous "Pots and Pans" thread. Once it's gets it's seasoned patina it is a great non stick pan. I could believe how it releases even eggs no problem. Much smoother and non stick than cast iron. If I want to use iron for acidic foods like tomatoes I use a 12" Staub enameled skillet. So far "Mano " I have not had problem with warping.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 9:44 pm 

Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 10:57 pm
Posts: 152
Calphalon anodized aluminium, some odd enameled cast iron pieces (mostly "rescues" from garage sales etc.) and a whole bunch of plain cast iron.


I'm interested in some De Buyer to try out/fill a couple of gaps in my kitchen battery. Can someone clue me in on the best online store to get it that ships internationally?


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 12:14 am 
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 1:52 am
Posts: 355
Location: Philly
I like the Paderno Heavy Duty Carbon Steel Frying Pans instead of the De Buyer carbon steel. Just as thick but 50% less cost. Just have to make sure its the heavy duty ones the normal paderno's are too thin.

Amazon best place for both.



_________________
There's an old Italian saying, don't burn your tongue on another man's soup.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 3:40 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:34 pm
Posts: 339
mano wrote:The only complaint I have with De Buyer is they warp. No doubt, it's my fault, but they still see daily use.

Calphalon, All Clad and other ferrous based pans don't seem to brown foods as well.


I have had absolutely no problems with my De Buyer pans warping.
As an FYI De Buyer makes 2 versions in their Mineral Iron line
I have a 12 inch Professional pan that is 3MM thick. I have to use the 15K BTU burner on my stove to get that bad boy hot.

My other 2 pans are a 10 inch saute pan which is 2MM thick
and my favorite the 10 inch Country French Pan, with the deep sides, also 2MM thick.
Those two work nicely on either a standard 8K BTU burner, or the 12K BTU burner.
I just processed and cooked 5 pounds of Portabella mushrooms in the de buyer country french pans.
IMHO no pan on the planet is better for saute of any vegetables than a seasoned De Buyer.

RE: Calphalon, I agree, the non stick pans do not brown food well.
The newer line, Calphalon Unison, comes in a Sear non stick finish, I have a saute pan in that line, it browns very well.
The infused anodized pans, that is another story, they brown food very well, as long as you watch your heat, usually lower than you would think, since anodized aluminum is a great conductor. The food will release once the Maillard reaction occurs, so just like my De Buyers, I don't touch the food until I see it release.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 5:14 am 

Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 10:57 pm
Posts: 152
whosthebestcop wrote:I like the Paderno Heavy Duty Carbon Steel Frying Pans instead of the De Buyer carbon steel. Just as thick but 50% less cost. Just have to make sure its the heavy duty ones the normal paderno's are too thin.

Amazon best place for both.


Thanks.

Anyone tried chefscatalog.com? They're doing 50% off int'l shipping, which can be pretty expensive.

From reading through some of the other responses, the de Buyer to get is the "Mineral Iron" line, right? Can anyone else compare to the Paderno "Heavy Duty"? Not interested in f&f/aesthetics, just fitness to purpose (on a gas range) and durability.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 5:41 am 
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 1:52 am
Posts: 355
Location: Philly
Yeah the de buyer mineral iron is their carbon steel line. both de buyer and paderno come unseasoned. usually coated in beeswax for shipping. so you will need to season them. I believe only Lodge (usa company) carbon steel comes seasoned. They are relatively new last couple years. I've actually tried all 3. My next one will be a lodge 12 inch. Amazon again is the cheapest place usually for lodge carbon steel.

And if you ever buy a silicone sleeve for your handle some of the shorter pans the handle gets hot I've used the same one on all 3 makers pans. My 14 and 15 inch carbon steel handle never got hot. The 12 inch sometimes. But the 10 inch was scorching hot all the time so I protected that one.

If you have never seasoned fresh carbon steel just let me know but I will give you the real quick explanation now. Get some Organic Flax Seed Oil (usually refrigerated at grocery store) and you basically coat the pan, bake, cool, repeat. You repeat this process 5-15 times. I obviously left out some steps but that is it generalized.

Technically you can use any fat to season. And a lot of time just discussing which fat to use can start a billion different responses. I've done olive oil, canola oil, extra virgin olive oil, and pork lard in the past. But found out Flax Seed Oil works the best. Makes it jet black and slick as ice. Flax seed oil is basically food grade linseed oil. Which has been used to cure and season a variety of materials since well forever.



_________________
There's an old Italian saying, don't burn your tongue on another man's soup.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Pots & Pans
PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 7:46 am 

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:15 am
Posts: 1177
Location: Raleigh, NC
While I don't use much cast iron I use lard if I need to season a pan for someone else. I always have it on hand for biscuits and cakes and it's easy to ensure the entire surface is totally coated.

As for handle sleeves, I picked up a full bag of kitchen towels a while back in a zany kooky adventure. Since the handles still reach burning temperatures in the oven, I generally just go with four layers of kitchen towel.


Offline
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 2 of 4 [ 37 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


suspicion-preferred