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 Post subject: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 10:56 am 

Joined: Fri Dec 06, 2013 6:15 am
Posts: 63
Hey guys. I've had the 210mm version of this knife for at least a month, and I have to say -- It doesn't respond like my other VG-10 knives at all. The difference between this and a main name-brand knife manufacturer is night and day.

In terms of steel this feels completely different than my other 2 knives. The steel almost feels soft when it comes down to sharpening it, or putting an edge on it.

I've over-worked it, probably, in my attempt to keep a paper-cutting sharp edge when I take it to task. And in doing so I realized just how thin the grind is.

Because I don't own a lot of other steels and have less basis for comparison, I feel this knife is going to last me maybe an extra LONG time just because of that kind of curved-in, super-thin grind behind the edge?

And in terms of chippiness? Is that a word? It is now! I really don't feel that scared because I won't abuse this knife any more than I'd abuse another knife on rude foods. It's got a ridiculously thin grind behind the edge...

I've spent a fair amount of time working on the tip of the knfe, because it remains thick where I can't just slide it through some onions on the front 2", but that hasn't bothered me too much because when I'm working the belly of the knife, it's tearing up onions and tomatos and chicken and pork and fish, relentlessly.

This sounds probably like a fan-boy review, and it may be because I spent X dollars on a knife and then shortly afterwards, the website and forums were updated to point out I did in fact NOT buy a carbon knife... So i went through a little 'poop my pants' phase where I was like.. holy crap, what did I just buy?? But the guys behind the site were more than accomodating if I wanted to back out.

Well, as someone who owns a few other VG-10 knives, I think that this knife stands completely separate from them.

It feels different when I sharpen it, it lasts different when I put an edge on it that I'm really proud of, and .... well... honestly, there are some moments when I've finished wiping down the cutting boards and see my baby standing up there above them on the counter, where I'm like... "yeah... that's my baby, it just did THAT.

Is that the gyuto "eye candy" factor? It's definitely the most attractive knife in my kit -- as I'm still mostly Ho handles.


(*I actually have tried to strop it on cardboard boxes as they came in, and feel like the edge 'woke up' again...noticeable improvement -- i dont know if that's my own screwy sharpening or what not, but it was fun to see that the box took it back to a new edge... I'm still learning how to sharpen..)

I feel like it's a fair progression in my own experience, and I have an ultimate hope of using a K----- at work one day. But this bitch is gonna work, damnit. And it's really nice to work with. Belly, push/pull cutting, yes. Tip, not so responsive, but I actually had to force myself to not take the knife to the stones over the last couple weeks... and in not doing that, we just kind of had fun cooking and shit. I learned a little about myself but learned a lot about my knife, in not sharpening it at all for the last week.

Dear Megumi,

Thanks. I've got much to learn.


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 Post subject: Re: Megumi Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 1:35 pm 

Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 6:20 am
Posts: 2066
Thanks for putting this out there. I know that a lot of people are skeptical about VG10, if this knife is going to get more attention it will be because people who own them talk about their experience with the steel. Keep it up.


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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 2:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:00 pm
Posts: 2472
Thanks Jeff for the much needed feedback. I edited your title to more clearly identify the knife. The entire Kurosaki Megumi line continues to impress me as I get to compare them directly against other, similarly styled knives. I don't put enough mileage on my knives to really test edge retention over a shorter time frame like the professionals. That said, these knives are just extremely well crafted, with great grinds, very good performance, and good looks, regardless of the core steel chosen for their construction. I hope more people give the VG-10 in this line and the Masakage Kiri line a fair chance and report on their experience. Shun seems to have driven enthusiasts away from VG-10 as a potentially viable, high performance option.


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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 3:50 pm 

Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 12:25 pm
Posts: 356
Good point Steve about VG 10 steel, the way the blade is made and heat treated is what is important. I have 3 Kikuichi Warikomi knives made from VG10 that are over three years old and the blades have held up very well and they sharpen almost as easy as some of my carbon steel knives. The 210mm Kikuichi gyuto gets used almost every day by my wife and the blade is sharper than the day it was bought and I have had no issues with chipping. From your reveiw and the pass around feedback it sounds like Kurosaki Megumi did right also! Good reveiw on your gyuto Jeff.


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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 6:14 pm 

Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:57 pm
Posts: 600
Thanks for the review! I am happy you liked the steel. I have had fine experiences with VG-10. Not the most fun to sharpen but not awful but I have no complaints about edge holding. I have heard great things about Hattori's heat treat but haven't had a chance to try one long term. Sounds like Kurosaki knows what he is doing.


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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 6:04 pm 

Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2014 5:24 pm
Posts: 15
Thanks for this! I've owned a cheap VG10 knife for a while now that cannot retain that steep of an edge and is very prone to chipping. I guess it really does depend on the manufacturer and the techniques rather than the steel.


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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 6:45 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4569
Glad your confirming what a lot of us were hoping, that when properly forged and heat treated VG10 can be a very good steel in a high end knife.

Good review, hope to hear more about it as you get better acquainted.



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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:51 am 

Joined: Fri Dec 06, 2013 6:15 am
Posts: 63
So.. I've had this knife for awhile longer now.

I got it pretty sharp... I made a video of slicing up phone book paper like the gorgeous video with 2.5million views... but I kept creating a wire edge and not a lasting one.

Yesterday I spent awhile on the stones, got a reasonably sharp edge. Cooked dinner. Braised pork chops with onions, peppers, mushrooms, garlic, nothing super fancy but enough work that I used only this knife for. I bought a rib section and used the knife to break down the chops as well as all the veg work. It was still nicely sharp at the end of the day.

Today, after reading more about stropping and finishing a blade on stones without a strop kit, I redid it on the Bester 1.2, Rika 5k, and King 8k, using the DMT slurry plate frequently and using the Beston to flatten stones, along with the pencil grid on the stone, and the sharpie trick. The 8k, I really only did a few light strokes with blade-weight at a slightly steeper angle on each side of the blade to 'finish' it? I was using a couple quarters to check my angle initially but also trying not to disregard what was already there, so i'm not sure of the exact angles.

Really changed the knife... I went from having a sharp knife where you can use the 3-finger test and apply some pressure, to getting this silly vg-10 a wee bit sharper where I use the 3-finger test and don't want to apply pressure at all. It's no carbon god of sharpness that will slice the ever-loving crap out of you but it's really, really nice. But it really took some time for me to learn how to fix it.

I sharpened it, used it. Sharpened it, used it for awhile. Sharpened it, used it for longer. And finally think even though I thought it was sharp before, using it and sharpening it a few days in a row has changed it up a bit.

As it stands, I don't seem to have an even 50/50 bevel and it seems to almost pull through foods where the blade wants to climb through with a tiny bit of pull to the right.

I'm right handed and the bevel on the left side of the blade, with the kanji, seems to be still miniscule. Less than 1mm? Whereas on the back side of the blade, i've created a larger bevel, maybe a hair over 1mm. It wasn't intentional and I'm not sure if I'm just discovering a bad habit I have.

So I'm curious if creating a different more 50/50 bevel will improve/hurt it, but I'm pretty happy with the non-wire edge it's holding right now. It LOOKS like 35/65 to the eye, but that seems drastic so I'd guess 40/60 maybe?

I'm posting that here and not in the sharpening section because I'm not sure if it's at all related to the grind on the blade with the convex/concave thin nature of the knife.


Last edited by Jeffuith on Sat Oct 04, 2014 6:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 4:32 am 

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:15 am
Posts: 1336
Location: Raleigh, NC
It's pretty normal. I over-sharpen the right side of the knife if I don't pay attention when I work on particularly dull knives. When you are removing a lot of metal, it's a good idea to flip the knife prior to burr formation a few times to ensure even grinding. There's no need to take any sort of action other than making sure you do a little extra work on the left side for the next few sessions.


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 Post subject: Re: Kurosaki Megumi 210 Gyuto
PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 5:23 am 

Joined: Thu May 29, 2014 8:38 pm
Posts: 1563
I am a very green amateur sharpener, and have done some bad things to good knives which has probably made me a bit skittish, but bevel symmetry aside, it sounds like you may be over sharpening the knife in search for that perfect edge. If the edge bevel on the right hand side has extended above the final, thin grind behind the edge and is creating a shoulder against a wider section of the blade, I'm not sure if the original performance can be returned. I did something similar and even after having the knife thinned from spine to edge, it isn't quite the same.



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