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 Post subject: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 3:30 pm 

Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 11:12 am
Posts: 61
Ok, so to get this out of the way first, I love wood cutting boards. Have had decent ones all my life; Some end-grain, some edge-grain. I am also an avid wood worker with a big fat table saw sitting in my shop (see, I do like wood). That said, most of my good maple boards (three now) have gone out of true over the years. I take very good care of them and they are oiled regularly. they are also on feet and never sit in direct water from counter etc. (nor are they ever washed in the sink directly with running water). Most of these are from large reputable manufacturers using good hard maple. (They range from 1.5 inches to nearly 3 inches thick.) None of the end grain boards have presented any problems, only edge grain (not sure what this means, but you guys that make boards for a living, tell me). I live in an 1800s house and in a very humid climate. When the AC is on, the house is dry, but when it is open, well, it is very humid. I am guessing that is one reason I have some problems with my boards.

On a whim, I decided to try a Sanituff board and I have to say that so far I really like it. What I really like is the fact that I can spill anything on this thing and not be obsessed with immediately drying the thing. It seems impervious to spills, food stains, acids from, etc. and is very easy to clean and maintain and takes any abuse I throw at it. I can wash is with solutions of bleach or soap and have no fear the thing is going to warp on me. I do intend to ultimately get a much larger end-grain board to cut on, because I do like the feel of the wood boards better when it comes to chopping, etc. That said, so far this thing really seems to do the job well.

Have any of you folks used Sanituff boards and if so, what are your impressions? It doesn't seem like they are dulling my knives appreciably over the wood boards, but haven't used it long enough to tell, and don't have a real objective test to determine this, other than basic observation Also, the board seems to show cuts rather minimally. Question is this: To those that have used them, did you stay with them and if so why; If you have used them and don't like them also curious as to why? Really want to understand how the edge retention is impacted by using these boards....This is less a question about wood vs. synthetics, and more a question of this kind of cutting board.


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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 3:37 pm 

Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 10:48 pm
Posts: 68
I have a Boardsmith cutting board that I use for most tasks, but not for raw meats -- for that I use a Sani-Tuff board. It's big, heavy, and ugly and lives under the counter most of the time, but it does what it's supposed to do and is easy on the knives.



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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 1:50 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 8:39 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Plano, Texas
Chester wrote: None of the end grain boards have presented any problems, only edge grain (not sure what this means, but you guys that make boards for a living, tell me). I live in an 1800s house and in a very humid climate. When the AC is on, the house is dry, but when it is open, well, it is very humid. I am guessing that is one reason I have some problems with my boards.


Hi Chester, the short answer is it's hard to know for sure. I'll give it a guess. And the science of wood movement is something that professional woodworkers almost never agree on. We all have opinions, though.

First, I think seasonal changes in temperature and humidity are likely the culprits, as you suspect. Rubber feet allow air to circulate around the board equally, so that should reduce the impact of exposure to the elements. But that's still my best guess. Another possibility could be if you always oil the top but never oil the bottom of the board.

I think I can explain why end-grain boards don't often warp (if they are taken care of). First, the end grain blocks are generally around 1 3/4" squares (some manufacturers use bigger blocks, granted). In theory, wood that is milled into smaller pieces will be under less tension, and less prone to bow, twist, or cup over the years. I have no doubt that people will disagree with me on this point, but that's the main reason that I've avoided using huge blocks of wood in my end grain boards. It takes more cuts and more time to use smaller squares, but I think it will be slightly more warp-resistant over the decades. Second, if end grain blocks expand or contract, they will do so in tiny amounts, and they will do so laterally. An exaggerated picture of this would be the entire length and width of the cutting board growing or shrinking slightly with changes in temperature and moisture. So the size of the board is changing, but it's staying flat on the counter.

A face or edge grain cutting board, on the other hand, is normally built up of big strips of wood laminated together. When humidity changes. Those can swell or shrink in a number of ways, resulting in cupping, bowing, twisting, just like happens to the hardwood lumber sitting out in my shop. Unlike the lumber in my shop, a face grain cutting board is constantly getting bombarded with moisture and humidity. So that's inviting those inner tensions in the wood to be released.

But... all that could be gibberish. It might just be that you are being sent a divine message that you need to buy a new end-grain wood cutting board.

FWIW, our kitchen island is end grain maple, and we cut on that most of the time. We also have a face grain walnut and maple board, and both have stayed dead flat over the last 5-6 years. The funny thing is the island shows very little wear and tear (other than where my 4 year old repeatedly hammered an ice pick into it). The face grain board, on the other hand, looks like it was in a terrible knife fight and lost.

John



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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 1:54 pm 

Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 11:12 am
Posts: 61
John, thanks for your insight. I sent you a separate note on your website, so will be interested in discussing further a decent end-grain option that might work for me. Hopefully you respond to the "contact" us part of your website?


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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 2:12 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 8:39 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Plano, Texas
Chester wrote:John, thanks for your insight. I sent you a separate note on your website, so will be interested in discussing further a decent end-grain option that might work for me. Hopefully you respond to the "contact" us part of your website?


Yikes! Yes, I try to be quick about responding to contacts... but I didn't get one from you. I sent myself a test message and it came through fine, so I think the system is working... This kind of thing is a small business owner's nightmare.

Would you mind trying to use the button again? You can just say 'hi'

My direct e-mail is john@lonestarartisans.com if you still have the body of the message.

John



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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 7:40 am 
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Joined: Wed May 09, 2012 3:59 pm
Posts: 1624
Location: Cape Town - South Africa
Sani-tuff boards may not look like a beauty queen, but they are easier on edges than any other material as well as super easy maintenance.

I use nothing else.

But yeah, guess it's a personal choice ultimately.

:)



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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 11:39 am 

Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 11:08 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Swede in Philly
I have and use both end grain and sani-tuff. Fora home user I'm not sure i notice a difference in edge life length.
My wife though notices the sani tuff as soon as it comes out and makes mewas and put it away immediately. They are kinda ugly.

The wooden board is allowed to stay on the countertop.

Bottom line for me is that i use the sanituff for messy work and the end grain pretty much for everything else. Sometimes i put a thin poly board on it though ...


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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:09 pm 
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...your wife makes you......

...who wears da pants inna house....is it you....unner da apron.....

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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 12:22 pm 

Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 2:14 am
Posts: 100
In a commercial kitchen they're virtually disposable. They discolor and end up with deep knife marks. You bleach them but eventually the health department says, "plane it or toss it". Like I'm going to have a plastic cutting board planed? It goes home with someone or gets tossed.

With that being said, they're nice for switching out for different protiens. I make sure they're small enough to fit in the dishwasher. Makes them easy and fast.


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 Post subject: Re: Sanituff Cutting Boards
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 12:43 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2012 3:58 am
Posts: 105
I find Sani-tuff to be too soft for my taste. I get the "good on edges" thing, but I'm not a fan of boards that the edge grabs into. I guess I put personal preference over good for the knife on this one.....



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