It is currently Fri Dec 19, 2014 10:54 pm



Welcome
Welcome to chefknivestogo

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!





 Page 1 of 1 [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 1:03 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7894
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Dear CKTG,

I was hoping you would have a minute to help me out with a few questions I have formed when narrowing down my selection for my first nice knife purchase. I’m a home cook, have been cooking for a while and lurking the forum boards and have decided to purchase a gyuto knife. I want it to be 210mm and the question I have is regarding maintenance and blade material. I am having a tough time finding what exactly is required of a carbon blade versus the less maintenance of a stainless blade. I do not know how to sharpen but would like a knife that I will hone before using each time and take to get sharpened a couple times per year; basically a solid all around work horse knife. I am interested in the Kohetsu Blue #2 Gyuto 210mm after a couple recommendations praising the knife but I don’t know exactly what it would entail regarding maintenance and upkeep of the knife and if that would actually be a good fit for me being that I do not know how to sharpen?

Any help you can provide would be much appreciated, thanks!

Taylor



_________________
Mark Richmond
Chefknivestogo

Chefknivestogo New Arrivals
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 3:42 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Posts: 7894
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Hi Taylor,

So first I highly recommend you learn to sharpen. All it takes is 1 stone and a little practice. I did a bunch of videos on the site if you want to learn the basics. It's really fun and satisfying and convenient to sharpen a knife with a stone. I'll help you if you get stuck. Once you learn it's like riding a bike and you'll never have dull knives again (unless you're lazy about it).

Ok, the knife you picked is a good one. Carbon steel is very simple to care for. Here are the steps. Use knife. Wash knife. Dry knife. That's it! If you happen to wash the knife and let it drip dry you may find it rusts a little. No worries. Get yourself some bar keeper's friend or even comet and scrub it off with that. Then you're good to go.



_________________
Mark Richmond
Chefknivestogo

Chefknivestogo New Arrivals
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 4:20 pm 

Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:57 pm
Posts: 600
Taylor, I agree with Mark's advice. Learning to sharpen seems intimidating, but in my experience it really wasn't in practice. There are a couple things to keep in mind here. First, any knife is going to get dull. Blue #2 is a good steel, and will keep a usable edge for quite some time as a home cook. If you don't need it to be hair-splitting sharp all the time, just usably sharp, then your plan of having it sharpened a couple times a year might work fine. Just keep on top of it with a hone or a strop. I only do a full sharpening occasionally, and actually use a stone to touch up the edge between uses, and find blue #2 keeps an edge just fine with that process.

However, if you are going to have someone else sharpen it, do make sure they know what they are doing. Not everyone does a good job, or uses the right tools. The learning curve to get a usable edge on a knife isn't huge, and though it would take a lot of time and practice to get as good as some of the people here on the forum (some of whom I believe sell sharpening services), it doesn't take a lot to do a better job with a stone than someone who uses a belt grinder to put an edge on. If you know and trust the person you would have sharpen your knive then this warning may not apply to you, but otherwise it is worth keeping in mind.

Mark is right on in terms of care. It is a good idea to keep a towel around to wipe the blade off if you are going to set it down for a while, but as it is stainless-clad it should be pretty robust in that respect. Do your prep, wash the knife, dry it with a towel, and let it air-dry the rest of the way before you put it away and you shouldn't have problems.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:16 pm 

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:15 am
Posts: 1437
Location: Raleigh, NC
I'm in full agreement with the above. I will elaborate on one point. You need to be excessively exacting in your choice of sharpener. Most of the sharpening operations in the US wouldn't and possibly couldn't get this knife to it's potential. It really requires the use of waterstones or a belt grinder with multiple belts, or a combination of the two, to be at its best. Blue steel takes an edge that is literally better than the best edge most people have ever used, but only if sharpened well.

To that end you will probably pay more to have the knife done. I assure you, it's worth it. The alternative would be sharpening it yourself which, as Mark said, is not bad at all. One decent combination stone would last most people many years and the act of sharpening is surprisingly cathartic.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:38 pm 

Joined: Thu May 29, 2014 8:38 pm
Posts: 1693
I would say that part of the point of buying a carbon steel blade is the relative ease of sharpening. Basically, after I bought my first carbon steel blade was when I decided I needed to start sharpening myself. I use an Edge Pro which makes it a real breeze. Literally only took a progression through 2 stones on my first knife to get the knack of it.

If you don't want to sharpen, it might be worth considering a powder metal knife. They hold an edge for a very long period of time and can get very sharp. The biggest knock on PM blades is that they are difficult to sharpen. But, if you are sending it in to place like Korin, you'd be passing along the headache to them anyway, so why not?

Also, if you don't want to sharpen or immediately spend an additional $15-20 on a post-factory tune-up, you will want to read reviews and watch the quick takes to find a knife that has a sharp out of the box edge. The Kohetsu B#2 Nashiji petty I just received isn't very sharp out of the box so may want to take that into consideration



_________________
Even a stopped clock tells the right time twice a day
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:46 pm 

Joined: Thu May 29, 2014 8:38 pm
Posts: 1693
Along those lines, if you are still interested in carbon steel, you should check this out:

Image

Masakage Mizu line. Uses Blue #2 and is hand made by Anryu for under $200. That is a pretty sick deal. And I can vouch for the sharpness of Masakage knives out of the box. Wicked sharp.



_________________
Even a stopped clock tells the right time twice a day
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 7:57 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2013 4:24 pm
Posts: 311
Hi Taylor, I'm a home user and I went through the same thought process a few months back. I wanted a knife that came sharp and thin behind the edge that could take a great edge and was easy to keep sharp with just stropping and the occasional session on stone (singular). I considered the powdered metal knives, probably harder to sharpen as were stainless knives in general except for AEB-L.

Anyway I picked the Kohetsu Blue #2. It was inexpensive, had great pedigree, the kohetsu AS was its sibling and they say it has the same grind and profile. Only thing about the Blue 2 was that it was not as hard and probably didn't hold an edge as long as AS. But being a home user I don't really put the knife through much of a workout anyway. Blue is better than anything I've used. Its sharper, so easy to touch up with a strop, easy to sharpen, most of my sharpening sessions just consist of stroping the knife on a 2000 grit green brick and then going to strop on balsa every other week and that's more than enough to keep it literally hair splitting sharp. I do strop daily so and that keeps the knife really sharp, it doesn't need it and would be fine with a weekly strop. Stropping is not hard, just a few swipes on balsa with some inexpensive compound on it works fine. Blue 2 takes to stropping very well.

As for cutting its just great. Drops through tomatoes, onions are a breeze. First time I cut an apple the knife passed through it with so little effort I thought it was a rotten apple, but it was crisp with glassy sides that didn't brown even after a night in the fridge.

The edge turns blue pretty quickly but it doesn't rust even if I leave it wet, 10 mins no prob. There's no smell or transfer or staining of food from the edge.

The blade is thin and there's some sticktion with carrots. But I did polish the blade and that left the sides super smooth so that could be part of the reason for the stiction but don't let this put you off. Its fine for most stuff and you'll appreciate the cutting ease, the stiction comes with the territory with any thin laser style blade.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2014 12:19 am 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4722
It really is as simple as Mark put it, use knife, wash knife, dry knife. You really should give sharpening a try, you might surprise yourself. A good dull knife cuts just like a bad dull knife, like shit.



_________________
If at first you don't succeed, pay someone that knows what they're doing.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2014 1:05 am 

Joined: Thu May 29, 2014 8:38 pm
Posts: 1693
Everyone is absolutely right about sharpening, but don't let that imply that if you don't sharpen, you aren't able to access/appreciate a good knife to the extent that your skills allow. There are some great sharpening services and, if you don't mind sending it in to one of them every 2 - 4 months or so, you will get great performance out of your blade. Again, everyone is right that sharpening is a more intimidating idea than a task, but sometimes the sharpening rhetoric can deter some from exploring the world of higher quality knives. Don't let it.

No sharpening service will sharpen your knives to maximize the potential of the steel you are using, or match your particular preferences in terms of finish/refinement, but I've found the better knives aren't really defined by that level of edge detail so much as they are by grind, forged taper, geometry/pattern, weight, balance and edge profile.



_________________
Even a stopped clock tells the right time twice a day
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Gyuto questions. How to care for carbon steel.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 5:25 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:12 pm
Posts: 242
Location: Maui, Hawaii
Taylor, like you I am a newbie at the JKnife thing.
Just wanted to let you know that with all the great help on this forum, owning and caring for these knives is not as intimidating as it might seem.
Caring for them is as easy as has been suggested and sharpening is, after the first couple of tries, plain fun.

I found a couple of old knives in the kitchen and within a couple of attempts had got a seriously good edge on them...well in terms of how they started at least.
Mark's videos got me off and running as they are really simple to follow but as detailed as you need.
There are several others out there that offer slightly different techniques and more in depth info. Try those after you have a feel for the task.

This is a really fun and infectious "hobby". Sorry all you pros out there. I started by saying I wanted only one knife. I just bought my third and I know the next is not too far off.
Sharpening and caring for them is part of the fun and fascination.
Enjoy the journey!


Offline
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 1 of 1 [ 10 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: jasonjl2002 and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


suspicion-preferred