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 Post subject: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:57 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:28 am
Posts: 258
I just ordered the 52100 sab artifex and am looking forward to my first carbon knife. After reading more than I'll ever need to know about baking soda and mineral oil, I find myself at a crossroad. How much benefit comes (beyond aesthetics) comes from the forced patina or am I better off in the long run letting it happen naturally?


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:13 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4216
If the knife is not so reactive that it causes problems with food I like to let it happen naturally.



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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 11:21 pm
Posts: 665
Location: Minneapolis, MN
I like it natural... it's fun to watch happen over a few days or weeks depending on knife use :)


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:22 pm 

Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 6:56 pm
Posts: 303
I prefer natural. I forced mine because the natural patina was taking too long. Not that it was reacting with the food, I just thought it was too shiny. :)

I hope you love yours as much as I love mine.


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:22 pm 

Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 1:49 am
Posts: 316
Location: Amstelveen, The Netherlands
I don't know that steel. When dealing with a highly reactive steel I would force a patina with hot vinegar after degreasing with alcohol, just to make sure it won't discolour onions or transmit any taste. With less reactive stuff you may just let time do its work.


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:29 pm 

Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 6:20 am
Posts: 1830
One advantage of forcing a patina is you can make it uniform and/or patterned. A natural patina will tend to form quicker and darker where the blade contacts food the most frequently, ie along the edge and toward the tip. A forced patina will look more aesthetically sterile whereas the natural patina will look more organic and uneven.

I have done both, I will continue to do both. You do whatever tickles your fancy.

If you have reason to care about what other think, so people see patina as dirty or unkept. A uniform forced patina would appear more purposeful.


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:31 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 4:42 pm
Posts: 3749
Location: USA... mostly.
85 <> The benefit of a forced patina is no different than the benefit of a natural patina. Patina is patina. I feel like I'm being punked.

If you need the protection of a patina now, force it. If you do not immediately need said protection, allow it to develop naturally. If you don't want the benefit of patina at all, polish out any patina as it develops.



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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:50 pm 

Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 6:56 pm
Posts: 303
Try it out for a couple of day and see how it goes.


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:00 pm
Posts: 2391
Melampus and others have remarked that cutting poultry will produce a patina that has a rainbow of blue and purple hues.


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 Post subject: Re: to force or not to force
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:49 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:28 am
Posts: 258
Does anyone know how reactive the 52100 steel is?


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