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 Post subject: Nubatama 2,000 Grit Stone
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:24 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
Nubatama Bamboo 2000 Grit Stone

I have been working with the Nubatama Bamboo 2,000 grit stone for a few weeks, and I agree with knife sharpening wizard, Ken Schwartz, that the Bamboo 2K stone is a “magical” stone. I have previously decided that the Bamboo 1,200 grit stone is a “magical” stone as well. Like the Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit, the Bamboo 2K behaves like a Japanese natural stone, produces a fine mud, and a finish that is similar to a Japanese natural.

There is really nothing quite like the Bamboo 2K in either a synthetic or natural stone. I particularly like to use the Bamboo 2K stone to sharpen carbon steel knives (as to harder stainless steels, like CPM154, I far prefer Shapton Glass stones, which are harder, and faster cutting stones). I have sharpened all of my Richmond Carbon 52100 knives, as well as Takeda and Konesuke san mai aogami super steel knives, with the Bamboo 2K, and have been astonished at the soft natural finish that it produces.

A good sequence on a knife with an established edge is to start with the Bamboo 1,200 grit, move to the Bamboo 2K, then finish on Yaginoshima Asagi, followed by stropping. The Nubatama Bamboo 2,000 grit stone is a “must have” stone for any serious knife sharpener.

For more on the Nubatama Bamboo 2,000 grit stone, go to http://www.chefknivestogo.com/nubatama6.html

For the Yaginoshima Asagi, go to http://www.chefknivestogo.com/yaas.html

For the Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit stone, go to http://www.chefknivestogo.com/nubatama1.html



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Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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 Post subject: Re: Nubatama 2,000 Grit Stone
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:45 am
Posts: 1421
Thank you for this review!

Yes, you 'get' it! I completely agree with you and your assessment - and the combination of stones you are using to precede the Yaginoshima Asagi. I have used this same sequence to precede a natural stone with excellent results, including the Hakka Tomae. Sometimes, I think I'm just off in a cloud somewhere, but hearing other knowledgeable customers reinforce my impressions is a real nice feeling. I would also agree that CPM154 and similar steels wouldn't be the ideal use of this stone, but (blasphemy) a drop of 4 micron CBN ( ~ 4k) on the stone should make it a serious contender for steels than have vanadium in them - an experiment I have not yet tried.

---
Ken



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 Post subject: Re: Nubatama 2,000 Grit Stone
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 6:41 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
No, you are not off in a cloud somewhere. The Nubatama Bamboo 2,000 grit stone behaves like the best of Japanese natural stones. Although it is possible to sharpen modern hard stainless steel blades on the Nubatama Bamboo 2,000, I prefer to use the right tools for the job at hand, which are the Shapton glass stones. But when I am sharpening a single bevel knife, or otherwise want a blade to look be as beautiful as the Japanese original, I will reach for the Nubatama Bamboo 2,000 grit stone....



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Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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