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 Post subject: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:05 am 

Joined: Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:58 am
Posts: 43
When it comes to Lasers, thinner is better. Some lasers are less then 2mm thick at the base.
At the same time when I look at other types of knives …I see that at the base they are twice as thick.
For example a yanagiba knife that I was just checking out is 4.4mm at the base.
I just wonder how does such a thicker knife perform in the real world of cutting?
Will it also be able to slice a super thin tomato wedge , like a laser can?
Other then sturdiness is having a thicker knife a disadvantage?


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 Post subject: Re: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:15 am 
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First, how a yanagi is designed to cut, the spine thickness means a lot less than on a Gyuto. This is true to a similar degree for all single bevel knives. Comparing them to a knife like a Gyuto, sujihiki or Petty is not, we'll, it's not really possible.

You can make paper thin slices of a potato with a yanagi, but the cutting technique would be different.

Gyuto to gyuto, spine thickness does matter, but not nearly as much as a great grind. I can make a knife with a 3.5mm spine still cut like a laser for the most part. Where you'd run into trouble is if that thick spine had to go through something.... like a pumpkin or something.

Small screen on my phone so I can't even properly review what all I've said, hope it all makes sense. :)



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 Post subject: Re: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 3:29 am 

Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2013 2:22 am
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....like a pumpkin or something.

Avoiding squash I see. Was this an attempt to placate me or a subconscious effort?


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 Post subject: Re: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:20 am 

Joined: Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:58 am
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Are the Japanese swords single bevel???
The single bevel probably takes some getting used to? Does it?
For Japanese people..in general... Is it easier to slice fish with a single bevel, 50/50, or is it about even?


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 Post subject: Re: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 9:40 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 5:13 pm
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The Japanese swords are a convexed double bevel straight into the edge. A single bevel sword would curve very badly in a cut. It takes getting used to a single bevel to cut and isn't the best for all around duties. I tried a single bevel gyuto on 1 potato and hated it. It curved very strongly and forced the hollow backside into the potato and stuck horribly.

Slicing fish with a single bevel may be easier than a double bevel since it is designed to have the product being cut pushed away from the blade (less sticking and friction), but the single bevel edges can be much more fragile and easier to damage than a double bevel. And they are a bit different to sharpen since you sharpen the whole blade road instead of just an edge bevel.

This all depends on the knife and grind. Some Suji's have thicker blades/more convexed grinds that may part the food better than a laser ground suji. A lot of it will be personal preference.


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 Post subject: Re: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 10:52 am 
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It might help to think of a double bevel knife as a V and a single bevel knife as half of a V, so the included angle is half with a flat back. This is simplifying things but it should help get the picture more easily.

The bevel on a single bevel extends further ultimately requiring a wider spine area. Thus the larger width and hollow back are useful for cutting things off the end of an object - carrot, green onions or chives, fish, etc but will arc horribly cutting something wide like a melon and also cause wedging or splitting on thicker items if cut in the middle rather than just on the ends. For most Western cuisine, very few people prefer single bevel knives.

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 Post subject: Re: Thick knife cutting performance Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:37 pm 
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Tall Dark and Swarfy wrote:....like a pumpkin or something.

Avoiding squash I see. Was this an attempt to placate me or a subconscious effort?


I had you in mind as I typed that. :)



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