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 Post subject: Re: Is Latte 400 a good low grit stone for me?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:57 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 875
When you reprofile you usually make the bevel wider and if you are lowering the angle then you with surely make the bevel wider.

It's not all that different from sharpening a existing bevel just pick a angle and stick with it until the bevel has been... well.... reprofiled.


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 Post subject: Re: Is Latte 400 a good low grit stone for me?
PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 7:36 pm
Posts: 2774
I can't think of a video showing the grinding of a new bevel.

Some tips:

1. Sharpie the edge and past the shoulder.
2. If you want to thin the knife (i.e. set a new lower angle bevel, reprofile, et al) make a few passes on a dry stone. What you're looking for in results here varies based on how much you want to thin the knife. A drastic thinning would equal just removing the Sharpie from the shoulder. A less drastic thinning would scratch the shoulder and part of the way down the existing bevel. How far down would equate into how much thinning. Further down toward the edge = less thinning. No matter how much you want to thin, the shoulder has to be moved up towards the spine in order to effectively thin the knife.
3. Once you've determined what angle that might be, stick with it throughout the coarsest grit stone you have until you've formed a burr on both sides.
4. Sharpie the edge once again. Make a few passes on a dry stone at the same angle. If the Sharpie is gone from the very edge to the new shoulder....you've done good.
5. If the Sharpie is not gone....you've done bad and must punish yourself with more grinding. :)



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 Post subject: Re: Is Latte 400 a good low grit stone for me?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 1:25 am 

Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:13 pm
Posts: 6
Thanks for the reply! I am aware of the sharpie method. I don't know why but I always have trouble sharpening clip points. Absolutely hate doing them.

On another note I was able to use the nubatama 150 bamboo! It did a terrific job in reprofiling and slightly thinning a s30v PM2 and the transition to my 1k shapton glass was easy. I stropped it with Hand American 1 micron boron carbide from CKTG and finished with a .5 micron chromium oxide. I might use my 4k shapton glass stone later when I have time, but the edge turned out great. I'm sharpening it for my cousin whom I sold this knife too.


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