It is currently Tue Jul 29, 2014 10:54 pm



Welcome
Welcome to chefknivestogo

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!





 Page 2 of 2 [ 13 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: What to do? - Crack in a Natural Stone
PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 3:47 pm 

Joined: Thu May 10, 2012 9:21 pm
Posts: 449
Nice job, looks great.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What to do? - Crack in a Natural Stone
PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 3:49 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 3394
There is this mystical substance out there that is suppose to be able to repair anything. I think I heard it called "Duct Tape". :mrgreen:



_________________
Those who say it can't be done are always passed by those doing it.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What to do? - Crack in a Natural Stone
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:47 am 
Forum Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:45 am
Posts: 1204
I've had pretty good luck with Spar Urethane outdoor. Be sure to get the water rather than oil based formulation for obvious reasons.

You can add pigment optionally. I also add tissue paper - like one would blow your nose with. This provides a structural framework that tightens as it hardens. I did a couple of layers this way on a stone that completely cracked and also glued the stone to a glass 3x8" blank so I could still use the stone in a stone holder.

You do want something like tissue paper that can be incorporated into the swarf in small amounts without concern rather than carbon fibers or fiberglass.

Most classically, one uses uroshi lacquer, however this is STRONGLY not recommended as it is HIGHLY toxic (essentially concentrated poison ivy). Among other warnings - use gloves, outdoors, etc, even with these recommendations, it is suggested strongly not to touch any membranes - nasal etc - including those of your significant other for at least 3 days. Pass.

Somewhat less classically but almost universally used in Japan these days is Cashew lacquer, however because it is flammable, it cannot be imported or mailed these days due to restrictions.

So for my uses what I first mentioned is what I use. I did this treatment on a Tajima stone broke in shipment. It's been working well since. I did go overboard with reinforcement, so it looks a bit rough around the stone :) But while too rough to sell, I can use the stone for my own use. It's the one I used in the Tajima video with the burgundy coating around the stone.

---
Ken



_________________
My Facebook Page
Ken'sCorner
Offline
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 2 of 2 [ 13 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


suspicion-preferred