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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 3:46 am 

Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 12:17 am
Posts: 7
Thanks for the reply WickedSharp.

All my knives currently are western style handles, Henckel’s and Wusthof's. I have been admiring he Wa-handled Japanese style knives for some time. I actually ordered the Kanehiro yesterday though the 210mm.

It was before reading your review.

I was looking around Marks site and it just struck me as the knife to buy both aesthetically (geometry) and functionally with the Agomi super steel interior and SS exterior. I love the overall shape and purposeful unpretentious appearance. The handle worries me the most as I've never used this style. I do use the pinch grip now with my knives.

I was having a little buyer’s remorse and found your review.

I purchased an Edgepro Apex from Mark several months ago and have made my German knives functional again but this led me to the knowledge that they are not really designed to have sub 15-degree angles on the blades. That, I believe, requires harder steel and a knife designed for this. So my quest for a Japanese knife. I have always loved the look of Wa-Gyuto's.. I pondered shuns and similar knives but wanted something more traditional and with carbon steel to work on my sharpening skills. The Kanehiro just seemed right.

I'm just a home cook so I do not prepare large volumes of food but do cook a lot and my specialty is Asian/Japanese cuisine so this knife seems fitting.

Anyway thanks for your thoughts on this they really help.


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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 4:03 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
You should NOT have buyer's remorse. I am budgeting for the 210mm myself. It may take a little getting used to the Kanehiro gyuto, but I think you will find that you will be using it for almost everything, and that your other knives will sit unused. The Aogami Super steel in the knife has incredible edge retention, and is surprisingly easy to sharpen. It comes sharp out of the box, and all you need to do is stay on top of it. A VERY good thing to have is a ceramic rod like the Idahone. If you simply hone the knife after each use, it should be a good while before you need to resharpen (on even heavy home use, maybe over a year before resharpening). Even then its simply a matter of sharpening by following the bevel as it is out of the box. And when you do sharpen, you will probably be able to start at 1,000 or 2,000 grit.

If you don't have an Idahone, you should budget for one and get one (make sure you include the leather sheath, because these ceramic rods are fragile. They are available here: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/sharpeningrod.html

Also, don't forget that the Aogami Super steel core is carbon, and you need to keep it dry after each use, and use a few drops of camellia oil, which you can find here: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/tsoilst1.html

I think a chef who has the Kanehiro gyuto, and a Kanehiro petty, is good to go for almost everything. Of course, a deba or fillet knife would be needed for fish, but, as my review indicated, it can be done with a gyuto. Make sure you post and let us know what you think of your new Kanehiro when you have a chance to get used to it.



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WickedSharp
Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 9:58 am 

Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 12:17 am
Posts: 7
Thanks for the tips WickedSharp..

It's interesting that I believe I have a idahone but with a black handle (12"). I didn't know the brand until now but it has exactly the same handle as Marks pictured hone. I purchased it a few years ago on a recommendation from a knife store. I have been slightly disappointed as it seems just to smooth to do any good ( I have the eraser too). These come in different grits and wondering what mine is (but it must be very fine) I do not see a stamp on it anywhere. I have always felt I didn't know how to use a hone as when I use it, for some reason, my knives feel slightly duller after a few swipes.. Maybe it is because it is removing the burr?.

Also, thanks for the tip on the camellia oil. Sure wish I would have ordered it when I did the knife.. Any other alternatives?

I love simplicity and would like to only have two knives as you suggest adding the petty. My wife accuses me I was a a Buddhist in a past life as shed all items I do not use.
Thanks..


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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
Regarding oil for your blade, you can also use mineral oil from the drug store that is used as a laxative until your camellia oil gets there. Easy on the mineral oil, though, unless you are cooking for enemies. Also, make sure you keep the knife clean and dry. As for your Idahone, it's probably about 1200 grit.



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WickedSharp
Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 3:43 pm 

Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2012 5:31 pm
Posts: 34
Hey Wicked,
Great review - enjoyed it very much. The info on the Kanehiro gyuto got my interest as I'm building my own arsenal of knives. I have plenty of knives but I've become more specific in terms of use.

Living in NJ I kind of know I'm in the wrong state, now, after reading of what type of game you have available I'm thinking that I'm living in the wrong part of the country.

I called my purveyor of hooch and he's bringing in some of the Teton Glacier Potato Vodka for me. I'll prolly snag an extra bottle and send it off to my favorite knife purveyor.

Thanks again, you write very well,
Keith


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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 4:16 pm 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
Lol the Glacier Potato Vodka is great. I've noticed it makes a great martini with a touch more vermouth than you would put in a Martini made from Stoly. And it's always good to know that your 240mm gyuto can stir your martini, because only James Bond takes his matini shaken, not stirred. As for game, there are more elk than people in Norheastern Utah. It's as remote as you can get in the lower 48 states. There are ranch owners who sell permits to hunt elk on their land for $20,000.00 and up, and of course, nearly all of the land is public land.



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WickedSharp
Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro 240mm Gyuto, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 6:34 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
The Kanehiro 240mm gyuto is now my Go To knife. I have used it heavily, and allowed my seasonal hunting and fishing lodge employees to use it, and to date I have not found a single chip in the aogami super steel edge, even when examined under a 10X loupe. The knife is badass.



_________________
WickedSharp
Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro 240mm Gyuto, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 1:49 pm 

Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 12:17 am
Posts: 7
WickedSharp wrote:
"The Kanehiro 240mm gyuto is now my Go To knife. I have used it heavily, and allowed my seasonal hunting and fishing lodge employees to use it, and to date I have not found a single chip in the aogami super steel edge, even when examined under a 10X loupe. The knife is badass."


I've received my Kanehiro 210mm and enjoying it very much.. You mentioned in your review that you used this knife for filleting fish. I tried this but did struggle a little with the blade thickness. It seems to add drag.. I have a inexpensive Victorinox fillet knife that I use and it seems somewhat easier but it may be that it is what I'm used too.

I have not resharpened this knife but have used my idahone ceramic rod some.. It seems to add tooth to the edge.


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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro 240mm Gyuto, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 2:33 pm 

Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 pm
Posts: 205
Hugo Wrote: "I've received my Kanehiro 210mm and enjoying it very much.. You mentioned in your review that you used this knife for filleting fish. I tried this but did struggle a little with the blade thickness. It seems to add drag.. I have a inexpensive Victorinox fillet knife that I use and it seems somewhat easier but it may be that it is what I'm used too. I have not resharpened this knife but have used my idahone ceramic rod some.. It seems to add tooth to the edge."

I wish I could have been there so see things. The Kanehiro Gyuto is certainly not a fillet knife. When I cleaned and filleted the fish, my purpose was to see how versatile the knife could be, because a good Gyuto must be versatile. For filleting fish, obviously a dedicated knife, such as a deba, or western fillet knife, would be far better in every way. Yes, it was difficult to fillet a fish with the Kanehiro gyuto, but it can be done. I have my Kanehiro sharpened at about 11-12% on each bevel, which is quite sharp. As to filleting, of course I used only the tip, which is the thinnest part of the blade. When filleting fish, I use a Suisin Momiji Funayuki, which you can see here: http://korin.com/Knives/Momiji-Funayuki_3

It is interesting that you mention the 210mm Kanehiro gyuto. Out of the box, my 240mm was quite sharp. When I got the 210mm Kanehiro gyuto, the blade was unevenly sharpened, with some sections of the blade being quite dull. Of course, a particular user may intentionally sharpen sections of a blade at different steepness, so that different sections of the blade can be used for different purposes, but the smaller the knife is, the less likely that will work. I don't use my 210 much for chopping, and even when I do, I have found that the Kanehiro does not chip, so I sharpened mine to 10% on each bevel.

As for the Idahone ceramic honing rod, it should make your knife edge feel more "toothy." Even after sharpening, your knife edge has small teeth, which bend as you use your knife. A honing rod, after the first use, and used before each use, actually bends the microscopic teeth back into position. If you are feeling that your knife is more "toothy" after using the hone, perhaps you are feeling the teeth that have been bent back into position. Make sure you hone at the same angle that you sharpen. Here is a video of Mark Richmond using a hone:




_________________
WickedSharp
Zen in the Art of Knife Sharpening
“If one really wants to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the Unconscious.” Eugen Herrigel
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 Post subject: Re: Kanehiro 240mm Gyuto, Chef Knives to Go, and Value
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 2:49 pm 

Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 12:17 am
Posts: 7
Hi Wickedssharp..

Thanks for the video on using a ceramic hone. I use Mark's method and it's possible that the toothy feel I described is that the knife is aligned and I feel that sharpness. There is a noticeable difference.

The Suisin Momiji Funayuki looks like a incredible knife, it seems in a different league than the Kanehiro.

I have a edgepro sharpening system and I checked the bevel of the Kanehiro. It seems to be about 10 degrees and that is where I will begin when I set it up.

My 210mm kanehiro came quite sharp but I will probably resharpen it soon just align the blade and have some fun with the knife.

Thanks for the tips on a fillet knife.. Your infinitely more knowledgeable that I with regards to knives and sharpening. I'm just learning.

Thanks..


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