It is currently Fri Oct 31, 2014 6:50 pm



Welcome
Welcome to chefknivestogo

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!





 Page 1 of 2 [ 15 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:02 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4301
Is there a safe and easy way to cut a full size stone to make smaller stones for different projects/experiments?



_________________
Those who say it can't be done are always passed by those doing it.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:36 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 10:53 pm
Posts: 335
Location: Seattle, WA USA
I have thought alot about this and would really like to try it. *I have not done it yet myself.*

I would imagine that a good quality wet tile saw would most likely work. I'd use one that is rated for cutting brick and tile. I have seen some tile saws described as being good for cutting up to one inch thick material. To me that would be pushing the limit of your equipment cutting standard bench stones and more risk of failure in getting what you want. I'd want something rated for making a thicker cut I think.

I'm curious if you would have to soak stones before cutting them? Or would you get better results cutting un-soaked stones. I'm sure there is a huge learning curve. I'm sure that method that works well for one type/brand/line of stone may not work for another? I can imagine a little mistake could be quite costly resulting in a handful of rock chips vs. a stone that you can use for something. Trial and error could become expensive and I guess that is what has kept me from giving it a try however much I'd like to.

Great topic, I'd really love to hear from someone that has tried it out who can share their experience.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 2:14 pm 
Forum Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 7:36 pm
Posts: 2834
The answer is most obviously yes, as Ken does it a lot....but alas I don't know how he does it or if he considers it public knowledge and shares his method. Here is a link to his corner at CKTG where a lot of his stones are for sale:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kenscorner.html



_________________
Adam

Image
http://marrknives.com
http://facebook.com/marrknives
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:42 am 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4301
Guess I'm going to have to figure this out on my own.



_________________
Those who say it can't be done are always passed by those doing it.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:50 am 
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 10:53 pm
Posts: 335
Location: Seattle, WA USA
If you want to contact me off board I'd love to talk with you about it.

I briefly spoke to Ken about stone cutting one day when we were talking on the phone. All he'd say was his method is proprietary and he kind tried to make it sound mysterious. I get that he wants to protect his gig, no worries.

I can't imagine that it's too much like rocket science? If you can cut tile and brick then you can certainly cut water stones. Yes, there will be some learning curve involved.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:43 am 
Forum Moderator

Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 5:13 pm
Posts: 2872
Location: CT
I have a cheap wet tile saw from Harbor Freight that is supposed to cut up to a 1" thick piece; you can flip the piece over to make the second cut I imagine if the stone is thicker. The blade runs in a water tray, so it does cut wet, but is messy. I am guessing the stone would chip less if it was soaked first? A segmented rimmed blade may work, or it may chip more than the smooth edge diamond blade.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:15 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 10:53 pm
Posts: 335
Location: Seattle, WA USA
I agree, it makes sense to me that a soakable stone would likely cut better soaked. My plan of attack is to start with some less expensive stones trying some different methods to see if there are better results? Hopefully that way I'll cut the trial and erroe expense a bit?

I'm thinking as thin a balde as I can find, and a saw that has a the ability to make a little thicker cut than just 1". I have been keeping an eye on the local CL ads there are lots of slightly used tile saws on the market. ;)


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:53 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:17 am
Posts: 4301
I can understand Ken wanting to protect his "corner", I would do the same.

Paradox wrote:...I'm thinking as thin a blade as I can find...
That was my thinking also. I would love to find something that I could use with my dremmel tool or RotoZip. I have thought about the wet saw but it just seems like it would waste a lot of stone.
When I finally think I have acquired the tools I need and get the nerve to give this a go I'll fill you in on how it went.



_________________
Those who say it can't be done are always passed by those doing it.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:23 am 
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 10:53 pm
Posts: 335
Location: Seattle, WA USA
I'm thinking in terms of cutting 6" strips as I'd want to make EP blanks. I don't think I could achieve the necessary precision with a handheld cutter like you describe so I have never even considered one as being feasible? I'll think about it.

I think you have to be prepared for a certain amount of loss to the process though.


Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting a Stone
PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2013 5:00 am 
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 10, 2012 2:12 pm
Posts: 41
Just go to your local landscaping place, spend $5 on a few pieces of flagstone, and practice with that. Heck, try them on some knives. Flagstone is slow, but leaves a nice polish.

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan


Offline
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 1 of 2 [ 15 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


suspicion-preferred