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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:43 am 
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Clayton,

FWIW if you wish you can use the CBN and diamond sprays on newsprint. It works well. Just a light spray and use dry.

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Ken



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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:46 am 

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 8:56 pm
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Location: Augusta, Ga
ken123 wrote:A microbevel is useful for finding out the limits of a knife. If you sharpen at an angle too acute for the knife given it's intended task, you can back off that acute angle with a - by definition - less acute angle microbevel. If this angle suits your needs just keep using it until it eventually becomes the main bevel.

Additionally if you sharpen at a more acute angle than needed and put a microbevel on it, you have essentially thinned the blade behind the edge. As the knife gets used over time, keeping the same angle as the edge gets closer to the thicker spine will make the same angle wider, giving you less cutting performance than when the knife was new, so it is desirable to thin the blade for this reason.

It takes far less metal removal to make an edge less acute than more acute.

You can also differentially change the angle with a 'tapered' microbevel. Thus for a deba or Traditionally shaped kiritsuke, you may wish the heel area to be less acute than the tip - to chop off fish heads with the heel and do delicate slicing or katsurumuki (eg thin daikon sheets) near the tip and middle section. You could achieve this with a less acute microbevel near the heel tapering to a disappearing microbevel further up the knife. Typically this is done freehand, but a skilled user can accomplish this with an EP WEPS or Gizmo by properly aligning the knife at an angle.

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Ken




Yeah; Thanks Ken. That's good info and it makes perfect sense. Sort of a "multitasker" idea. Durability where you need it ( towards the heel) and delicacy where you need it. I'll try that as soon as I can muster up the focus to execute ( or try to execute it) properly.
Thanks again for the info!


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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 7:59 am 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
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I use micro bevels on the Richmond Artifex in my finish sharpening, its not normal for me to use a micro because I generally convex my edges but for that blade it just works.


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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 6:14 am 

Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:58 pm
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I went through the forum and this was the closest match to the question I have (got some great info along the way).

I've used micro bevels for years on wood working tools and my Messermiester knives. Now I have my first gyuto, a 210mm Artifex. I was reading Chad Ward's book and he is a proponent of micro bevels. He's suggesting even a 10/15 double bevel for Japanese knives. Is this a good idea for the Artifex? It will never see a bone and will be used almost exclusively for cutting vegetables with some duty as a meat slicer.


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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 7:59 am 
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Gbguy,

The key concept here is what angle the steel will hold. The second key concept is what you will use the knife for. So if you are splitting lobsters all day, you need a less acute angle. If you are gentle and barely touch the board with each cut, and don't hit bone, etc etc you can go more acute. So 10 degrees per side is pretty acute and in my hands the Artifexes, which use a variety of high quality steels, CAN take a real acute angle. So consider no microbevel initially at say 10 degrees. If this doesn't work out, you can add a microbevel at 12 degrees. If it is still not robust enough FOR THE TASKS you ask it to do, go to 15 or even 17 degrees. You dial it in for your needs. This is a better approach than just setting some arbitrary setting like 10/15. Further sharpening will be at the angle of the microbevel until such time as you need to further thin the edge. If you are using convex edges, you just make the curve less and less acute for increasing robustness and more and more acute if the steel can handle the tasks at a more acute angle.

When cutting meat, fascia or silverskin, removing skin or hide and cutting through joint ligaments cuts through material that dulls edges more rapidly than muscle. This is just something you will work out with experience cutting.

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Ken



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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 2:26 pm 
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It's not a bad idea by any means. I agree with Ken though....I like to start very acute....well, reasonably acute....and see if the knife can handle it. 10 degrees per side sounds good but I'm not an angle guy which is weird cause I'm a freaking engineer. :o

If the edge fails, I either add a microbevel or resharpen more obtuse.



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 Post subject: Re: Micro Bevels
PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2013 4:02 am 
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What? An engineer without an angle cube? If this keeps up we'll have to take your pocket protector and slide rule away from you :)

Adam's right though. You don't really need to measure it - even though I usually do. Just make it more or less steep until it is 'just right'.

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