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 Post subject: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:26 pm 

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:13 pm
Posts: 3
My wife and I set a $100 limit on Christmas gifts to each other, and with my $100 I'd like to pick out a good knife for myself. I came to this conclusion because I cook at home often, and there are many times when I need a knife. I make a lot of BBQ and the only thing I have is a cheap carving knife from Pampered Chef and a horrible Henckles "eversharp" serrated edge block set. I'd love to have something really sharp for trimming ribs, pork and beef. Just recently while making chili using beef chuck and and all sorts of ingredients which need to be chopped up, I decided to use my gift selection as a good, all purpose, kitchen knife for me. Initially I was thinking that I would just pick out a $100 knife and call it a day. Of course, reading through all of the different styles, sizes and steel choices, I now want to make sure I get the perfect knife to suit me. I also think I will need to add some sort of sharpening apparatus to my selection as I see there are quite a few ways to sharpen a blade. I've never used a stone before but I am willing to learn if that is what is recommended. So, here I am seeking some feedback and suggestions for a $100 set which will include an all purpose knife and sharpener. Thank you in advance for your input.


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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 11:20 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:20 am
Posts: 483
$100 for a stone and knife isn't much.

Having said that, these would be nice:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/riar21.html
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/todp21wa.html

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/ar10gr.html



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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 2:54 pm 
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A Richmond Artifex 210mm chef's knife and a 1000 grit stone:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/riar21.html

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/bester1200.html

All you'd "need".....let us know when the fire of desire for more burns out of control. :)



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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:34 pm 

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:13 pm
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Thank you for the suggestions. I have a few more questions. Since I have no experience with a sharpening stone, would be be better to learn to use one or to just stick with one of those roll types? Since I am new to all of this, should I just stick to getting a good knife now and start looking for a stone later? How long would you say a good edge lasts? I would really only need this knife maybe once a week. If the knife maintains a sharp edge for quite a while, I may not need to sharpen it often or do most of you sharpen before each session? Also, is there a difference with the Torijo knives that have English printing on them vs. the ones with the Japanese writing? Thank you.


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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:54 pm 
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Location: CT
Using it once a week, the AEB-L Artifex will hold an edge for a while, but I would think that you would want a good 1000-1200 grit stone and a 4000-6000 grit stone. Bester 1200 and Rika 5K come to mind, but it's around $100 for those 2 stones. May be worth it to kick in a bit more and get 2 stones with the knife instead of buying them later to save on shipping?

Or this combo stone?
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/imtwosi1kst.html

In terms of sharpening, I sharpen it when I notice that it feels like it's not cutting as nicely as it should. It won't keep the fresh off the stone scary sharp edge forever, but it will cut nicely for a good bit of time. If you want, get one of the strops and some compound for it for touchups and save up for some stones? You can also use a strip of old leather belt, too if you need to!

Leather Strop:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/haamsplest.html
Balsa Strop:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/bamapa.html
Compounds:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/bocapa1mi.html


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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 10:27 pm 
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I think the only difference in the Tojiro's is the handle...which is a fairly big difference. Different handles feel different when the knife is held at different angles in the hand. My advice for sharpening is to search youtube for videos on japanese sharpening...watch as many as you can, then practice(experiment) with another cheaper knife until you are comfortable/confident sharpening both sides. Then move onto your new knife. I usually sharpen every 2nd or 3rd time; i like maintaining a razor type edge. Everybody's different and the steels are different so there's no real answer...you'll come to know what you like when you start getting used to your knife.

Here's a good link for some reading: http://www.cheftalk.com/a/japanese-knives-101



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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:17 am 

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:13 pm
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I've tried my best to do research on the knives from this site, as well as the knives recommended to me here. I also talked to a friend of mine who is a local chef and he suggested that I not buy online. He recommended going to local stores and feel the handles of the knives, something I couldn't do online. So I did this at a store that only carried Henckels, Shun and Global (as compared to what this site carries). Of all the knives, the feel I liked best is the Henckels Profection. Based on the statistical information, the Henckels does not quite measure up to the Torijo DP nor the Richmond Artifex. Also, the Henckels is only carried here in a 2 piece set:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/profection2pc.html

So, I could either get the Henckels from the local store (it is on clearance - I'm guessing its an older model) for $84. Or take a risk on buying online here of the two other brands, which on paper appear to be better knives. But, I have no idea how they feel until I get it. Do you agree that knowing the feel of the knife is better than taking a risk with one that you may not like once you hold it?

One more question. Do most knives come sharpened to nearly the best they could be? Or, do they have a "factory" sharpness that is up to the consumer to sharpen even better?


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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:57 pm 
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First, I believe CKTG's return policy is great. If you get a knife and don't like the way it feels, it won't cost much in return shipping to try a different knife.

That's not the greatest plan, I understand that. But, I'd rather use that plan than use a crappy knife any day. :)

All production knives come with something akin to about a 800 grit edge. No where near it's full potential.



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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:28 pm 
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Sorry I didn't reply but Tim and Adam gave you good recommendations.

Try my Artifex gyuto and get a stone like the King 1K and that will hit your budget and give you a good knife and stone.

If you wanted to spend a little more upgrade to the Imanishi combo stone.



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 Post subject: Re: Home cook - needs a good blade
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 7:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:18 pm
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Location: Madison Wisconsin
Hi Mark,

I have a few more questions that went unanswered from the others in my follow up questions. Could you help with these too?

These are from the same post. Thank you!

Since I have no experience with a sharpening stone, would be be better to learn to use one or to just stick with one of those roll types?

Is there a difference with the Torijo knives that have English printing on them vs. the ones with the Japanese writing?

I've tried my best to do research on the knives from this site, as well as the knives recommended to me here. I also talked to a friend of mine who is a local chef and he suggested that I not buy online. He recommended going to local stores and feel the handles of the knives, something I couldn't do online. So I did this at a store that only carried Henckels, Shun and Global (as compared to what this site carries). Of all the knives, the feel I liked best is the Henckels Profection. Based on the statistical information, the Henckels does not quite measure up to the Torijo DP nor the Richmond Artifex. Also, the Henckels is only carried here in a 2 piece set:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/profection2pc.html

So, I could either get the Henckels from the local store (it is on clearance - I'm guessing its an older model) for $84. Or take a risk on buying online here of the two other brands, which on paper appear to be better knives. But, I have no idea how they feel until I get it. Do you agree that knowing the feel of the knife is better than taking a risk with one that you may not like once you hold it?

Thank you,
Jeff



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