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Re: PM Steel Traits, Sharpening...

Tue Apr 15, 2014 5:07 pm

The things people worry about. :roll:

Re: PM Steel Traits, Sharpening...

Tue Apr 15, 2014 5:28 pm

@ Slider

Keep in mind we're talking about two completely different applications here. Something like a pipeline, is going to be experiencing extreme pressures and other environmental stresses that a kitchen knife will never see. I don't think you have to work about a kitchen knife failing under use. Good point to consider though, with your background in mind. Never hurts. Traditionally, swords were bonded with harder and softer materials to make them stronger in terms of severe impact. Modern Japanese Kasumi knives wouldn't benefit from this however, as we don't fight with them! Unless you consider fighting a piece of Cabbage with it? So these days, it's really more about cost savings and aesthetics I think, vs anything else.

You'd want to focus more on steel type, grind, height, profile, weight and purpose more than anything else imo. Personally, I'm not that big into the Damascus look. I like the Fujiyama Damascus that Mark just got in, but that's an exception as far as my tastes are concerned.

The Japanese have been bonding metals for weapons for over a thousand years; another point to keep in mind. PM steel while being very hard, also contains alloys that are extremely tough, so you're getting a steel that is the best of both world's in theory. But again, I'd take my Fujiyama because of the grind over any PM knife with a lesser grind, regardless of the PM advantages.
Last edited by desol on Tue Apr 15, 2014 9:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: PM Steel Traits, Sharpening...

Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:19 pm

If you don't want a clad knife yet, there's no reason on earth to buy one. As a metallurgical tech/engineer I think you know enough about how steel works. Use the knives you feel comfortable with and, as you delve further into this rabbit hole, you'll get comfortable with other possibilities. All of the various styles and construction methods have some sort of purpose and more experience opens us up to that. It's how most people start using a chef knife, then a gyuto, then a 240mm gyuto, then carbon steel, all the way up to a 360mm yanagiba made by a 90 year old smith using techniques accumulated over a dozen generations.

Re: PM Steel Traits, Sharpening...

Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:39 pm

Wow, Lepus, you nailed my progression. I started with a cheap santoku (the Chefs) made by a taiwanese company called Atlantic Chef, its pretty good for what it is and the price. Then the tojiro DP gyuto 210, then the 240 Goko hammered damascus, then got my first carbon and am looking at getting my next carbon now. Not looking to go to a yanagiba just yet although I just picked up a Nikiri.
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