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Nubatama Bamboo 3,000 Grit Stone?

Sat Jun 30, 2012 8:12 am

Does anyone know whether the Nubatama Bamboo 3,000 grit stone behaves like the 1,200 and 2,000 grit Nubatama Bamboo stones? That is, does the stone behave like a a soft Japanese natural, or does the 3K behave like a hard synthetic stone, like the Nubatama Bamboo 1,000?

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 3,000 Grit Stone?

Sat Jun 30, 2012 1:16 pm

The Nubatama 3k is the same formulation as the Nubatama Bamboo 2k, but finer and will act in a similar manner. In this way this addition to the series can act as a final polisher for certain applications and as a smaller jump for some natural polishers (awasedo). Much like the logic for the Chocera series, you would use either the 2k or the 3k but not both in a sharpening progression. Which one you pick would depend on what preceds and follows it and the abrasion resistance of the steel you are sharpening.

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Ken

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 3,000 Grit Stone?

Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:11 pm

Thanks, Ken. For What types of steel and blades would you recommend using the Nunatama Bamboo 3,000 grit instead of the 2,000 grit?

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 3,000 Grit Stone?

Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:08 am

The indications for steel types should be the same. The resultant edge would be more an issue of simply the grit desired. Thus you might select the 3k as a final finisher, whereas the 2k might require an additional stone. It really is just an option. So the 3k might be a fine choice to precede a natural polisher (awasedo). It really is the same issue as why you would use a 3k or 2k stone in a sequence in general.

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Ken

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 3,000 Grit Stone?

Mon Aug 06, 2012 7:05 am

"Thanks, Ken. For What types of steel and blades would you recommend using the Nunatama Bamboo 3,000 grit instead of the 2,000 grit?"

Please check out the 3k bamboo video I finished this weekend. I specifically tried to answer the questions you posed. While this stone is superb for carbon steels it turns out to be an excellent all around stone too. A bit of a splurge to use on a cheap crappy knife but it will do the job. But on a carbon knife it really is a superb stone.

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Ken
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