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Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit sharpening stone

Sat Jun 16, 2012 4:20 pm

I've been working with the Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit stone for a few weeks now, and love it. For the most part, I prefer fast cutting hard stones like the Shapton glass series because they don't require soaking and you can sharpen a knife quickly. Sometimes, however, I just want to enjoy myself and not rush things, and that is when I pull out the mid grit Nubatama Bamboo stones. The 1,200 grit stone requires very little soaking.

Knife sharpening wizard Ken Shwartz calls the Nubatama Bamboo 2,000 grit stone a "magical" stone, and I agree. To me, the 1,200 grit fits into the "magical" category as well. Both the 1,200 and 2,000 grit stones behave like Japanese natural stones in that they form mud that changes the nature and finish of the edge as you sharpen. This characteristic makes the 1,200 extremely versatile because you can simply splash the mud off if you don't want the type of edge that mud helps create, or create as much mud as you like, and wallow in it to your heart's delight. I especially like this stone for working with white steel knives.

Highly recommended.

For more on the Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit stone go to http://www.chefknivestogo.com/nubatama1.html

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit sharpening stone

Tue Jun 19, 2012 8:36 pm

Again an excellent review. Thank you. The 1200 acts very much like a Monzen Aoto, something we will be getting in the next shipment, but spans that gap of being useful for natural and synthetic stone usage. Almost reminds me of a warm chocolate bar :)

You might also try wiping some of this luxurious mud on to a piece of paper or balsa and using it as a dry technique too. Seems a waste to wash good mud away, but that's a habit of mine :)

It is truly an enjoyable stone to work with if you enjoy working in some nice mud.

---
Ken

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit sharpening stone

Sun Jun 24, 2012 9:58 pm

WickedSharp wrote:Both the 1,200 and 2,000 grit stones behave like Japanese natural stones in that they form mud that changes the nature and finish of the edge as you sharpen. This characteristic makes the 1,200 extremely versatile because you can simply splash the mud off if you don't want the type of edge that mud helps create, or create as much mud as you like, and wallow in it to your heart's delight.


Non-expert question: how would you define 'the type of edge that mud helps create' verus others? Would mud/nat stone edges end up a bit softer perhaps?

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit sharpening stone

Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:04 pm

The finish on naturals and Nubatama Bamboo is more of a sand blasted haze finish instead of a shining finish.

Re: Nubatama Bamboo 1,200 grit sharpening stone

Mon Jun 25, 2012 6:29 am

As to the type of edge that a Japanese natural creates, the Japanese natural is not of the uniform grit as a synthetic stone. The result is that the microscopic teach on the edge are uneven. Some claim that this results in an edge that lasts longer than an edge created on synthetics. Myself, I think it is primarily a difference in aesthetics.
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