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 Post subject: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 11:35 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:10 pm
Posts: 135
I am getting pretty good at getting knives really sharp. I have been doing my knives and the knives of my colleagues for a few months now. No complaints so far, and good feedback.
Some feedback I received from a 70/30 bevel I did was the knife was great because of the razor like edge, but later I was told the edge didn't last more than a few weeks. This colleague said he has had the the edge last a few months in the past...done by much more skilled sharpeners than me. I know how to get them really sharp, so how do I get the edge to last longer?
Any ideas?


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:49 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 992
Your probably taking the edge too fine.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:53 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2014 2:38 pm
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might be the angle, too. if you are sharpening at 15 degrees, try 18 or 20, and the edge should be more stable.

pat



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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:56 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
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studio398 wrote:might be the angle, too. if you are sharpening at 15 degrees, try 18 or 20, and the edge should be more stable.

pat


This would be the logical thought but is actually incorrect. The thinner angle will last longer in most every case regardless of steel type, hardness, or grind.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 1:15 pm 
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Depending on what knife this is, the burr/wire edge could have not been fully removed. This is the most common cause for sudden lose of cutting ability.



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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 2:23 pm 

Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:28 pm
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This would be the logical thought but is actually incorrect. The thinner angle will last longer in most every case regardless of steel type, hardness, or grind


Jason, that logic took me some time to learn and I think I may of first read it in "An Edge in The Kitchen"
This is true because the more acute angle requires less force, less work on the edge basically. The reduction in friction results in the improved edge retention. Yes?


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:14 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 992
Correct!

Cutting is about geometry, how sharp a edge is is nothing more than personal preference.

When the edge and more importantly the blade is thinner the force pushing back on the edge apex during the cut is minimized reducing edge deformation and wear. As the blade becomes thicker the effort to make the cut and the forced produced at the cutting edge sky rocket.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:55 pm 

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:15 am
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Location: Raleigh, NC
As said above, it's very possibly the level of finish. Not only does that highly refined edge loose its bite faster, I notice performance degradation much more keenly coming down from higher heights. If your test subject noted the edge as razor-like, it's entirely possible you bested the previous sharpener.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:59 pm 
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Well that's cool to hear. Although I wouldn't want to consider misuse right off the bat.
What grit would you suggest for a Glestain Acuto Steel.
How far up the grits would you take it? And what angle is appropriate? It is a 70/30 bevel.
Thanks...


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 4:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2014 2:38 pm
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Jason B. wrote:
studio398 wrote:might be the angle, too. if you are sharpening at 15 degrees, try 18 or 20, and the edge should be more stable.

pat


This would be the logical thought but is actually incorrect. The thinner angle will last longer in most every case regardless of steel type, hardness, or grind.


Jason,

thanks for setting me straight. this was something i always assumed as true, but now i understand it much better seeing how the increased pressure against the edge apex will cause deformation. thanks again.

pat



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