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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:02 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:10 pm
Posts: 109
Holy Hell! This is great stuff. :D
You could read one hundred sharpening books and not get close to the concise discussion and conclusions drawn on this forum. Particularly this thread, in my case.
THANK YOU OH SO VERY MUCH! :lol: (laughing with joy)

Plus, yes and yes please to the sticky. It would be immeasurably helpful to us newbies.

-mikey p.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:29 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 8:34 pm
Posts: 1543
You're very welcome Pat and Mikey, (and whoever else actually reads my rants)

It's been a long time coming, but I think it's time to comprise a sharpening guide for CKTG customers. A sticky thread is in the making.

Just to add another level to this argument, because I'm still awake....

I said all these things not taking honing into account. If you are using a honing rod (steel) or a strop then thing can change a bit.

An edge on a good carbon steel knife will roll a bit but if you have a strop or good honing rod you can bring that edge right back in a few swipes.

An edge on stainless won't roll so much but it will not come back as many times with steeling and responds even less to stropping after damage.

New alloys and powdered metals can alter these arguments, as well as extreme high hardness (63+). But this is really more getting into the "steel" side of things and I better stop there before this gets out of hand. ;)



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Shaun Fernandez

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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:47 am 

Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2013 2:22 am
Posts: 706
Y'all better quit it before you know who shows up.

Wait! Didja hear that? Sounds like flannel rustling through the maple trees.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 6:45 pm 

Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 497
You're a beautiful man Shaun, great input here, brilliant.

Respectfully
Peter


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:03 pm 
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Thanks Pete



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Shaun Fernandez

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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 3:03 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:10 pm
Posts: 109
To follow up on the OP, I found out the owner of the 70/30 beveled knife I had worked on...the one who complained about the knife not staying sharp longer...has been using a diamond steel to hone the knife.
Nuf said?


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 4:57 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
Posts: 890
Lol, I guess it's better than those that asymmetric grind a clad knife then complain about edge retention.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 5:39 pm 
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Only if you actually cut past the cladding line will that matter, Jason. Most clad knives can be sharpened 50/50 well past the cladding line, but when you go asymmetric you can hit one side of the soft cladding. SO, to those of you reading that want to sharpen past the cladding on a knife, remember to stay closer to 50/50 if you can.

Here's the problem I'm seeing: Consistency between 2 users.

YOU sharpened the knife, HE did not. HE has no idea what angle you used, and is using diamond which can easily reset the bevel to whatever or destroy the edge altogether.

I blame the other user if you were able to get it sharp, beyond that you either have the edge too steep and it is failing, or it needs thinning because he is losing the edge then has no bevel left to work with. A thin bevel can still do some work as the apex of the edge loses sharpness. If he didn't complain about performance at first then I'd opt to say the knife is too thin right now, but no way to tell without seeing it I suppose. 70/30 sharpening tends to make a thinner edge.

My opinion to remedy the problem: I would simply add a micro-bevel around 2k and see how he likes that. If the knife doesn't perform to his satisfaction although it keeps an edge, then it will need thinning..... and a micro bevel. AND, depending on the steel I'd opt for closer to a 50/50 edge for strength.

Any questions? :)



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Shaun Fernandez

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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 6:00 pm 

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 12:29 am
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"Only if you actually cut past the cladding line will that matter, Jason. Most clad knives can be sharpened 50/50 well past the cladding line, but when you go asymmetric you can hit one side of the soft cladding. SO, to those of you reading that want to sharpen past the cladding on a knife, remember to stay closer to 50/50 if you can."

That's the joke.

A lot of unknowing new cooks get told asymmetric is the way to sharpen all knives. I've seen more than my share of knives where the cladding was the cutting edge.


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 Post subject: Re: Longevity of the edge
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 6:44 pm 
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Jason B. wrote:
A lot of unknowing new cooks get told asymmetric is the way to sharpen all knives. I've seen more than my share of knives where the cladding was the cutting edge.


You and me both! :)



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