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Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Mon Jan 14, 2013 5:40 pm

Hello,
New member here. Apologies if this has already been covered, and I missed it in my search.

I'm looking for recommendations on buying four starter knives, just to use to cook for my family & friends. 1. Chef's (plan on getting a Santoku, so was thinking about getting a 10", instead of a 8"). 2. Santoku ~7". 3. Paring. 4. "Utility", then maybe a Bread/slicing knife.

I started not knowing much except some metallurgy/material science on the blades, and was favoring the Wusthof IKON series, then I liked the Shun Preimer for the better steel & looks.

Now I'm looking at JCK.com Gekko, Shun Preimer (on sale for about the same price of Gekko) for looks and most likely everything I will ever need.... or MAC's for a good price & what seems in most cases a thinner & better metal blade.

May I ask for any recommendations on a hammered damascus or thin forged blade made with some tungsten carbide or better metal than VG-10? Are SHUN's worth a little more for the warranty?

Thank you

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:55 pm

Sakai Takayuki has some Damascus clad AEB-L blades available:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/satajadawa.html

I would get a 240mm gyuto, 150mm petty, Tojiro ITK Bread Knife and either a small paring knife if you do a lot of in hand stuff, or a Nakiri if you do a lot of slicing of veggies.

Hiromoto AS series are also nice; they have a few pettys (120 and 150mm), 190mm Santoku and 240mm gyuto's. Aogami Super is a carbon steel that really holds an edge well and is clad in stainless, so only the exposed carbon core near the edge with patina/react to foods.

There are lots of other great knives out there that will hold an edge better than VG-10.

Whats your budget like for the 4 knives?

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:16 pm

Taz, Thank you for your post.
My budget:
-I'd like to stay in the $400-700 range, and can spend more, but from what I've seen, that should get what I need/want.

*I'd like to keep all the knives in the same series.
*I'd also like blades that hold an edge the best/longest.

If it matters, I'm right handed, and work with both style of handles (Wa & Jap), but usually favor a Wa.

Thank you for your help

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Mon Jan 14, 2013 10:43 pm

Same series isn't any fun :) Part of the fun is trying different brands/styles of knives!

The Tojiro ITK Bread knife is awesome and the Artifex one is very nice, but I prefer the wavy serrations of the ITK since it tears less that the sharp tooth style of serrations. The Artifex uses AEB-L, which is a nicer steel than the Tojiro ITK.

Sakai Takayuki has a 240mm Gyuto, 150mm Petty and 160mm petty, all Wa and with AEB-L core with Damascus cladding. The 3 knives cost $470. There is also a Suji in the series, but it's only 240mm long; most people prefer a 270mm or longer. This will get the main knives in the same series if you want a nakiri. I wouldn't go crazy about a small paring knife; get the Artifex 80mm for $40, ITK bread knife for $63 and you are up to $573 total. Add in a couple sharpening stones and you should be able to tackle most chores with that.

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Mon Jan 14, 2013 11:14 pm

Any suggestions on Euro style handles?


Thanks

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Tue Jan 15, 2013 2:39 am

what I have been told, and read in several different forums was not to put a lot into the bread and paring knives. The Forschners do a better than decent job and are dirt cheap

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Tue Jan 15, 2013 2:13 pm

These aren't bad:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kielgowakn.html

But they'll blow your budget badly.

The same Sakai Takayuki knives Taz recommended has a western handled version:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/satada.html

Might be a really good option

Otherwise, not sure.

However, I definitely don't like the idea of feeling stuck with a particular single brand. Some knives in the same series are not nearly as good as others. Just food for thought.

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Tue Jan 15, 2013 2:25 pm

I will disagree about the bread knife. Small paring knife, yes, but with the Tojio ITk bread knife, it will keep it's edge longer and is a much cleaner cutting knife and you should be able to use it as a slicer because of the wavy serrations it has. Most other bread knives have pointy serrations and these can leave crumbs and tear food more. I use the ITK bread knife for slicing pineapples, watermelons and other stuff like that and it works great for more than bread!

The other Sakai Takayuki Damascus are MUCH more expensive than the Wa handled ones and I wasn't sure if they used AEB-L or not as the core steel.

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:10 pm

Watercrawl, from what I've read & learned, your right about picking knives on the type (or best for that type) and not going by the same series. I guess I have a matching set problem, liking everything symmetrical & matching. I'm sure it's an amateurish thing, and I don't know why I'm that way. I may end up just trying to stick with black handle knives..we'll see.

On the bread knives...I like the design of the Tojio ITK, and MAC. I wouldn't mind paying a little more for better metal, & I'm not for sure what's used for the Forschner/Vix.

The Kikuichi Warikomi is a nice set, but it doesn't look like the bolster is welded on.

What steel would be better than VG-10? I've been trying to find listings for some of the Carbon makes, to find Tungsten.

Thank You

Re: Knife/'s Recommendation for Home/Hobby cook.

Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:15 pm

Blue Steels (#1 and #2) have Tungsten, as well as Aogami Super (Blue Super). AEB-L is known for having great edge holding, as is S35VN and CPM 154 and M390.

Most people find that Vg-10 has lackluster edge holding performance compared to some of the other steels available.
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