Switch to full style
We encourage you to post your questions about kitchen knives here. We can give you help choosing a knife.
Post a reply

Knife recommendation for processing deer

Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:21 pm

I am looking for a boning knife to help process deer. I want something that is good and reliable, but won't break the bank buying it. I usually end up doing 3-5 deer a year. Thanks for the help.

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Sun Jan 13, 2013 3:54 pm

I tried a Honesuki and it didn't work as well for me. The Hankotsu may be a better choice for boning, or a good carbon boning knife that you can touch up easily on a steel. For trimming fat, I was using a few different 210 Artifex and 240mm Artifex and Addict 2 gyuto's, but a good 150mm or 180mm petty would also work for trimming the fat and silverskin and be more nimble, but wouldn't be as good for the actual boning since they tend to have thin edges. The Hankotsu should be able to do the boning and trimming; maybe get 2 so if it starts to lose it's edge, you can just switch to the other one.

This Hankotsu should be good and got good reviews, but it's pretty pricey.
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kielcaha15.html

The Hiromoto AS or G3 150mm petty, Fujiwara SS or Carbon 150mm petty, Artifex 150mm, Tetsuhiro 150mm petty, etc should all work well for trimming duties if you want to use a petty.

For slicing down roasts and portioning stuff, I go with a 240mm gyuto or a 270mm suji. I also have used a Tojiro DP 330mm gyuto for slicing roasts, too. 1 cut and you are thru the whole roast :)

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:37 am

honesukis are really for poultry. hankotsus are designed for boning out larger sections of meats. it will work awesome for deer. but you'll still need a knife for trimming, a 150 petty will do nicely.

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:14 pm

What kind of knife does one typically use processing a deer? Would you not want something longer than 6"?

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:28 pm

virtuovice on youtube would use hunting knives all the way when he does his deer, skinning and boning them out. i would imagine the hankotsu would do quite well on the boning part.

the petty would do okay for skinning and taking care of the trimming as well.

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:09 pm

I process deer with my uncle during hunting season. We use a regular drop point hunting knife to skin and separate the quarters. We bring the quarter inside, and my uncle uses a 6" boning knife (regular Western style) to debone the quarters. He tried the Honesuki's a few times and it was too pointy, not enough curve at the tip for him. The Hankotsu should work great though with the curve! Once a piece is boned out, I trim the fat/silver skin off (150mm petty or Hankotsu would be great here) and break down further with the smaller knife or gyuto while he debones the next piece. We may chop up the smaller muscle groups for ground meat for sausage, or slice down larger portions into steaks or clean them for corning. The smaller blade would also work for this, but a gyuto or suji is awesome for slicing steaks and stuff and makes the work go quicker and the edge last longer. 210mm wa petty may be in order for this, too, since it will be longer to slice the pieces down instead of using a 150mm Hankotsu and a 240mm gyuto, but still narrow for trimming. The edges on petty's would be too thin for the boning work since we scrape along the bones and pop the joints with the tips sometimes.

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:21 am

watercrawl wrote:What kind of knife does one typically use processing a deer? Would you not want something longer than 6"?


A Phil Wilson South Fork in S90v does the trick. It will cut and cut and cut. Just don't pop any hips with it.

Re: Knife recommendation for processing deer

Tue Jan 15, 2013 2:20 pm

Yeah, I definitely wouldn't turn a Phil Wilson down. :)

What a nice guy.
Post a reply