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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sat Feb 08, 2014 7:10 pm 
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To much BS for me to swallow. Image



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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 3:05 am 

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How long have you been waiting to use that emoticon?


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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 6:24 am 
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ELIZABETH <> Regarding the inconsistent temperature column in your oven, a large stone like the Fibrament<--link come in sizes to fit commercial or residential ovens. Adding a stone to your lowest rack will even out the heat. A cheap way, that we do in restaurants, is a sheet pan, for you a 1/2 sheet, lined with red mexican tiles.

JEFF <> I skimmed DOUG's post, and I wonder what exactly you take issue with. CO is no joke. I sat in a hyberbaric chamber for almost 4 hours to decompress the CO molecules from my red blood cells after the opener forgot to turn on the exhaust. This was not a usual exhaust though whereas you could hear it so I knew no better. Shit, this had to be around 1997, I was a baker at an Artisan Bakery/Cafe in Boca Raton, Fl and we had a humongous imported Italian brick rotating deck oven in the center of the dining room. The exhaust was plumbed in a manner in which you couldn't tell if it was on or off by just standing at the oven as it was the center of the dining room. Dramatic design, but this oven was out-of-this world. Anyhow, I started moving my proof racks to the oven station at 07:00, and got to work. It's too long a story that involves a cracked skull, lots of blood, more saliva, two restaurants (connected by their kitchens), HAZMAT, sherriffs, EMT, two hospitals, a hyperbaric chamber, a born-again-Christian, & more, but I can attest to the absolute necessity of evacuating spent fuel exhaust. Funny times... :lol: thinking back I had to be restrained by more than a couple Sheriffs after barricading myself in an outdoor air-conditioning chiller vestibule that I had run into after EMT was unsuccessful in their attempts to strap me to a stretcher. I was having nothing to do with it, and streaked off in a whirlwind of spit & blood. My mind thought they were trying to take me away... they were; just not in the context that my mind understood.



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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 8:31 am 
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MEL --> I know CO is no joke. I know CO can kill. I have CO detectors in my house. I can fully understand a situation happening as you described, in a situation like you described, with the equipment you described, BUT in the average home I call foul. I have used a gas range most of my cooking life without a vented hood. I have one now and never turn it on except during the summer months and there has never been an issue. Most of the cooks in my very large family use gas, some don't have vented hoods. I have never in my life ever heard of anyone, anywhere at any time having any type of gas poisoning from cooking with gas at home, never. I have a CO detector in my kitchen and if the exhaust fumes were that bad I think it would go off now and then.

I have these detectors in my house because of the furnace and water heater are both gas and burn significantly more fuel than my stove in a days use. Between the two if something isn't exhausted properly that can become dangerous. The stove would have to be under near continuous use for there to be enough fumes to matter. Cooking a meal doesn't burn enough fuel to produce enough exhaust to be dangerous.

People have been using natural gas for more decades than any of us have been around and now it's all of a sudden dangerous so be careful and use an exhausted hood, BS. Just because some study in Cali says something is bad doesn't make it fact. In Cali everything is bad for you and will kill you, it's a wonder there is still anyone alive out there. The article states that the levels measured were acceptable for outdoors but not in the home. You can breathe the shitty air outside just don't do it in your home because it's bad for you there, yea right. There is probably more exhaust fumes in their homes from smog then cooking.

And this is nothing against Doug, I understand he is just sharing information. Articles like these, now days, I find to be nothing more than scare tactics of some sort. JMPO and nothing more.



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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 5:53 pm 
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JEFF <> As there is no tone in text, it's a bit difficult to read your sentiment in your last post, but I didn't think you were bashing DOUG. Also, I'm not one whom subscribes to liberal PC bullshit nor had I read the study, only skimmed as indicated, but I reckon the claim is that subjecting yourself to nominal amounts of poisonous gases over an extended period of time has a collective effect. If your sensors are triggered @5ppm, but you breathe 4.5ppm everyday, as an example, in the abstract.

Trust me... I eat food off the floor, I eat chicken & pork @medium, I eat raw beef & fish, I'll hang out w/you if you have the flu, if I were ever unfortunate enough to be stricken with disease people call children - they wouldn't be allowed pads & helmets, etc., etc., etc. I'm the furthest thing from a California hippy.



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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 6:17 pm 
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MEL --> My only sentiment in that post is I tend to pretty much ignore these "Studies" that have no real evidence or fact to come to the conclusions they make. The words "may","might" and "could" are used to much which leads me to believe they don't really know. To me it's just sensationalism at it's best.
My posts were a reaction to the article and I do commend people like Doug that take the time to share any information that is meant to help inform people.
This is only my average, everyday person opinion. Hell, I could be wrong and my be getting ready to drop dead any minute from cooking with gas, who knows. I do know I'm not a bit worried about it. ;)



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 Post subject: Re: I hate my oven... Sooo much.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:14 pm 

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As part of just sharing info ...

I thought Jeff made a good point about his CO detectors not going off. Turns out (from UL Listed Carbon Monoxide Alarms Will Not Alert You to Low Levels of CO The text between ellipses is a quote):

... UL listed carbon monoxide alarms will not alert you to low levels of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide alarms keep people from dying; they don't eliminate all health risks. Underwriters Laboratory standard UL2034 requires carbon monoxide alarms to not sound off when exposed to carbon monoxide levels under 30 parts per million (ppm). This means that if you have a furnace with a CO reading of 25 ppm in the flue gas, you could place the carbon monoxide alarm right inside the furnace's vent and it would never go off.

Even at higher CO levels, UL listed CO alarms might take a long time to sound off - long enough for you to start experiencing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. Seattle home inspector Charles Buell just wrote a post on this topic, where he tells the story of how a kitchen stove was producing CO levels at over 600 parts per million, but the UL listed CO alarm never made a peep.

Does this mean that low levels of carbon monoxide are safe? No. There are numerous studies saying that low levels of carbon monoxide exposure cause health problems; there are links to many such studies at CO-Experts Home Page. Even though this web site looks like it was designed in the early 90's without being touched since, it has some good information.
...


However, in this Minnesota (not one of those California crazies ;) ) author's experience gas fireplaces, furnaces, boilers, and water heaters "makes up 95% of the exhaust gas leaks that I find during home inspections."

Low level CO detectors are available, but pricey at $250 - http://www.aeromedix.com/Ultra-Low-Leve ... -2014.html


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