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Re: high grit stones question

Wed Jun 19, 2013 7:52 pm

Call me Mr Task Specific :)

For some knives and tasks, I'll go all the way up to 640,000 grit - and appreciate the performance difference. But not always. As another extreme, I have been sharpening knives for a local restaurant. He routinely TRASHES edges on his knives - chips and tips. Scrapes edges on cast iron pans, cuts on stainless counter tops and other horrors. So I tried an experiment, resharpening his knives (cheap ones) with a 150 grit belt edge initial AND final finish and reduced my prices. Result? He couldn't tell any difference for the work he does. Less work for me, less cost for him. Happy Happy. Task specific. If a customer can't tell the difference he shouldn't pay for an overly refined edge. For my personal use, I require a much more refined edge, but still stay within the limits of the knife to hold that edge.

Another aspect to all of this is natural stone edges. Now we get into an area where the edge type can no longer just be characterized by a simple grit rating... This in no way negates BDL's comments regarding synthetic stones but simply extends it further when dealing with natural stone edges.

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Ken

Re: high grit stones question

Wed Jun 19, 2013 9:43 pm

what knife/task enjoys the benefit from a 640,000 grit sharpening?

Re: high grit stones question

Thu Jun 20, 2013 1:30 am

Lately it's been my zdp-189 pocket knife (Jess Horn Spyderco). I have it at a 7 degree per side bevel and use it for delicate tasks, carrying at least one other pocket knife for 'rough' tasks. I use it mostly for cutting fruit and minor surgical tasks like reshaping small cuts so they heal faster / cleaner. (I have a background in hand and microvascular surgery and appreciate good wound healing. )

I use it on both 'roo and nanocloth. What's interesting is that if you strop on nanocloth alone, you see no metal swarf, however - even with a light spray of 0.025 poly, you DO see metal swarf on the nanocloth strop. I find this a perfect touchup for very high grit finishes as it is still surprisingly aggressive. And I also use it prior to shaving with my kamisori and straight razors.


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Ken

Re: high grit stones question

Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:54 am

MadRookie wrote:"For instance, Ken Schwartz and Mad Rookie will take a knife light years beyond where I would take it; while plenty of mavens consider anything finer than 2K to be too much for a gyuto."


With reason, MadRookie. The Takeda yanagiba Ken sharpened for me is the sharpest thing I've ever touched. I only use it to slice fish or meat, but when I do this, it's heaven.

Re: high grit stones question

Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:47 am

I am not disputing the point, my knives are all rounders & the edges appropriately finished to my liking - each to his own.

:)
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