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Re: Henckels on deck

Fri May 17, 2013 11:37 am

Thanks for posting this. Pretty interesting to see what Naniwa has to say on the subject. I also think it is interesting that Veggies and seafood are suggested beyond home use. I would think that home use would mostly be veggie prep. I guess that is what the 1k-1.5k overlap is for.

Question about the sword though . . .

Why such high polish on something that theoretically would be one of the most roughly used edges of the bunch. It this polish just cosmetic or is there something functional about the edge being highly polished?

Re: Henckels on deck

Fri May 17, 2013 2:10 pm

Thanks, Sailor!
They don't exactly promote their highest grits. Would it be a matter of credibility?

Re: Henckels on deck

Fri May 17, 2013 3:12 pm

I think it is a realistic approach by Naniwa and it bears credence for me because it reflects what the good folks on the forums have been telling me for a long time. If I was a smarter man, I would have listened to them sooner.

Re: Henckels on deck

Fri May 17, 2013 3:53 pm

Sailor wrote:I think it is a realistic approach by Naniwa and it bears credence for me because it reflects what the good folks on the forums have been telling me for a long time. If I was a smarter man, I would have listened to them sooner.

+1 Except for the that fact that I have only been sharpening for a little over 6 months so I have started to listen to them sooner. :mrgreen:

Re: Henckels on deck

Mon May 20, 2013 4:54 am

Here's how I deal with softer steels.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VPCvd5hUVQ


Badboy, per your sword question. Swords work on a different cutting physics which is more like a heavy chopper. Think push cut.

And looking good it part of it too though more of a after effect.

Re: Henckels on deck

Mon May 20, 2013 1:57 pm

Finished up my customer's Henckels over the weekend. The blades literally had NO bevel whatsoever but only major indentations on each side of the knife where he clubbed it like a baby seal with his honing rod. He's used them in this condition for over 5 years, and he's a fairly talented chef....amazing. Now I have them in what I like to call, Cut on Contact condition and I feel like I need to sit down and have a full-on safety session with him on knife handling before I turn over his blades, and have him sign a legal document stating I am released from all damages forthwith. lol.

Yea, "Badboy", I had watched a video of a modern day Japanese sword polisher and he made a statement that the actual sharpening of a Katana is completed within the first 4 or 5 stones, the rest is for aesthetic purposes to bring out the beauty of the steel. Interestingly enough, however, historians have discovered some blades coming from the famous Kamakura period (1185 - 1333) that possessed a high level of polish, per the "Art of the Japanese Sword" (Oustanding book by the way).

Josh
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