Switch to full style
We encourage you to post your questions about kitchen knives here. We can give you help choosing a knife.
Post a reply

Helping choosing a Gyuto

Mon Dec 10, 2012 2:48 pm

Hello everyone,

I'm in the market for a good Gyuto and with so many choices out there, I was hoping to solicit some advise on which one would be best for our kitchen. Over the years, my wife and I have purchased multiple "cheap" knives. Of course they perform poorly and become frustrating to use and constant resharpening. I'm too the point where I'm ready and willing to invest in a good knife but I just am not sure which one would be best.

My requirements:
1. Must be a good "workhorse" knife. We cook a lot and whichever one I purchase, it will be used daily.
2. Holds a sharp edge for as long as is reasonably possible.
3. Is easy to re-sharpen and maintain.

I've been looking at these 3:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/mi.html
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/ictkcgy21.html
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kigoelsugy21.html

The Misono UX10 looks like a good choice but I love the Dasmascus steel on the Warikomi. I'm also intrigued by the TKC, mainly because it's less expensive than the other two but appears to be close in quality. Is that accurate? I can't seem to locate any construction info on the TKC and I'm concerned about the care of the Warikomi. These concerns have me leaning towards the UX10 but I don't want to make the wrong choice.

What would you suggest?

Thanks
~El

Re: Helping choosing a Gyuto

Mon Dec 10, 2012 2:55 pm

Welcome to the forum!! :)

Your requirements 2 & 3 are almost opposites, FYI. A knife that's easy to sharpen will often have the shortest edge life and vice versa.

Of the three, the TKC probably meets your requirements the best. It's a "semi" stainless as we refer to it....so it's not quite a carbon, and not quite fully stainless. It can stain, but only slightly....nothing like a full carbon. It's fairly easy to sharpen, and retains an edge very well.

Definitely get that one in my humble opinion.

Re: Helping choosing a Gyuto

Mon Dec 10, 2012 4:12 pm

I guess I should have been a bit clearer. By easy to sharpen, what I mean is that I'm looking for a knife that can be resharpened back to a "new" edge condition if that makes sense. What I don't want is a knife that once used will never be as sharp as when it was new. I assume that if properly sharpened that should not be an issue with any of these, but I'd like to be able to sharpen it myself and be successful doing it. So, I guess easy to sharpen for me means it's pretty straight forward to sharpen it and get good results, using the correct sharpening tools. Which brings me to my next question - What is the best way to sharpen these things? If I go with the TKC, what should I be looking at for making sure I have the proper sharpening equipment?

Thanks again.
~El

Re: Helping choosing a Gyuto

Mon Dec 10, 2012 10:01 pm

Most production knives have somethin akin to an 800 grit edge, so getting them back to "new" is not something I shoot for....I want something that takes well to sharpening up to 10,000 grit....which the TKC will....as will more or less any knife we'd recommend on a site like this.

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/3pcstoneset.html

A set like this will get you a good start (perhaps finish) with sharpening.

Re: Helping choosing a Gyuto

Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:41 pm

Thanks Adam. What is your opinion on having a knife professionally sharpened? I have no idea what it costs....but what would you say are the pros and cons? I'm trying to decide if sharpening is something I want to try to undertake but I'm also trying to figure out if it makes sense for me to do it or just to have it done. I'm a total noob at this, so sorry for all the questions.

Re: Helping choosing a Gyuto

Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:38 pm

Learn to sharpen. It's pretty easy and once you have the power you will never live with a dull knife again. It's also fun.

Re: Helping choosing a Gyuto

Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:26 pm

First, sorry for the tardy response....had a rough day yesterday.

Cons of having a knife professionally sharpened far out way learning to do it yourself.

Cost
Having the knife gone for long periods of time
If you need a sharp knife and your knife isn't, you're screwed :)

Pros:
None that I can think of except that they may be better than you ever will be.
Post a reply