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Green brick and general help

Thu Jun 20, 2013 3:50 pm

Hi,

I am a newbie to sharpening my own culinary knives at home.

I am interested in purchasing the "green brick of joy" and noted that the price was $50. (I have already a 400 course Latte). I do want to take advantage of the free shipping for a purchase of $60. So, I was hoping to speak with someone regarding buying another product to flatten out the stones which I think I will need eventually. But, I am not sure that I will need it anytime soon since it is just myself and my wife using the knives. If I don't need to buy this product soon perhaps I would purchase a holder for the sharpening stones as I plan to sharpen them over the sink.

I guess I am hoping for some general advice.

Gary

Re: Green brick and general help

Thu Jun 20, 2013 3:54 pm

Hi Gary,

The green brick is a good stone. It will work good with your 400 latte (that's what we sell it as).

You could easily use just those 2 stones. I'm not sure if you want a sink bridge but we sell a couple that work well like this Tojiro one: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/to1.html

If you're handy you can make one out of a 2x4...

As for flattening try this one: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/140grdistflp.html

Re: Green brick and general help

Thu Jun 20, 2013 4:16 pm

A good flattening plate/stone is essential to sharpening. A stone should be flattened after (or before) each sharpening session. It prolongs the life of the stone and provides a better medium for sharpening.

This is a good choice:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/140grdistflp.html

I would also recommend a stone holder. My preferred method is a sink bridge like Mark linked to.....I love that thing.

A regular stone holder like:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/nastho.html

Also works great if you don't have a sink to fit the sink bridge or just want to be able to sharpen on a table top of work bench.

Re: Green brick and general help

Thu Jun 20, 2013 5:42 pm

The flattening plate and stone holder listed above gets a BIG +1. You can make a very sharp edge just using the Latte and Green Brick on most of the knives you will likely need to sharpen.

Mark mentioned 2x4's for making a sink bridge and that is exactly what I did. Home Depot will give you scrap pieces of wood from custom orders they cut for customers . . . free = :)

Here is another thread where this was discussed:

http://www.chefknivestogoforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2184

Re: Green brick and general help

Thu Jun 20, 2013 6:58 pm

The Latte 400 and Green brick make a good stone combo. I'd add the 140 grit flattening plate to this order and go from there.

Re: Green brick and general help

Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:19 pm

"A good flattening plate/stone is essential to sharpening. A stone should be flattened after (or before) each sharpening session." - Adam Marr

This is very true. The first time I used a water stone I dished the crap out if it trying to sharpen a real beater knife and realized how soft these types of stones were and went ahead and bought a diamond plate.

+1 on the cheaper diamond plate CKTG sells because an at home cook isn't going to demand as sharp of an edge as a professional chef which I by no means am, just saying I am buying one of those next time, not a DMT.

Re: Green brick and general help

Fri Jun 21, 2013 2:27 am

In my experience diamond plates suck for lapping stones like the green brick. They form a mud quickly when lapping which causes the plate to suction to the stone and/or stop working. This will also cause the diamond plate to be damaged as the slurry rips out the diamonds.

Re: Green brick and general help

Fri Jun 21, 2013 2:33 am

Good information Jason, how would you lap the green brick?

Re: Green brick and general help

Fri Jun 21, 2013 4:11 am

I use another stone or a basic grooved flattening stone.

Re: Green brick and general help

Fri Jun 21, 2013 4:21 am

I have read that the diamonds bonding can be affected, but only if you use for lapping something like a 400 grit or finer diamond. For diamonds coarser than that, it's not an issue. I have used a DiaFlat on all of my stones, including a 220 Norton. That stone is soft and dishes quickly and makes a mess of a mud, but have not seen that affect the diamond coating. Granted, I flatten under a stream of water.

cheers,
wm_crash, the friendly hooligan
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