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Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:17 pm

Hi Mark,



I recently bought an Edgepro Apex from you, and I've enjoyed browsing your site the past few days. I'm developing a Christmas wish list and would like to ask you for some advice:



1) If money were no object, what in your opinion would be the best 240mm Wa-Gyuto on your site? If you'd like to narrow it down further I can say that I am leaning toward Blue #2/Aogami steel. I have the same question for a Nakiri.



I know the answer to the above depends on the user, so let me tell you something about my general skill level and background. I'm a 49-year-old avid home cook with good knife skills. I cook mostly French and Chinese. Most of my knives are German but I have a few Western style, thin-bladed Japanese chef knives that I bought at the Tsukiji fish market that I end up using most often, but they're nothing special. I'm a fairly good free-hand sharpener and have stones (Bester, King) ranging from 800-1000-4000, plus a Kitiyama 8000. I would have no problem with the additional care a carbon blade would require and can easily get into the nerdy side of this stuff.



2) I love the Edgepro for my existing knives. Should I also use it on a traditional Japanese knife like a Gyuto or a Nagiri, or do them freehand? Opinions about this on the knife forums seem to vary.



3) Are Takedas as good as their cult following would suggest, or has their acclaim led to a slight dropoff in quality?



Thank you very much for your advice!



Best wishes,



David

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:25 pm

Hi David,

Takeda's knives have a cult following for a reason. They're really good performing, hand made knives made by hand at a reasonable price. I love his gyutos since they're tall, thin and hard. His 240 gyuto is our best selling higher end knife on our site. If you don't have one of his knives this would be a perfect one to get.

I always recommend that my customers try different stuff so try this awesome nakiri by Konosuke. It's blue #2 and had a really nice grind and excellent handle:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kofubl2na18.html

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:28 pm

1. Money no object and currently available....one of the gyuto's from Mr. Harner!! :)

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/butchharner.html

The man has skillz at the grinder.

There are other great knives on the site as well and this is no knock on them. I have a personal love for Butch's work.

2. EdgePro should be fine for all double bevel knives within reason.

3. I've not seen a recently made Takeda in some time. The first one I got probably 7 years ago and it had issues. I got another one some time later and it was a great, great knife. In terms of steel, geometry, rustic beauty, profile....it was fantastic.

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:58 pm

Mark, thanks for replying, and also to watercrawl for the advice thus far. The Konusuke looks great, though I do like the KU finish of the Takeda. There certainly is no lack of options!

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Thu Oct 18, 2012 1:12 pm

If you have more questions on different knives let us know. The custom and semi custom knives are really fun to own and use and we try and specialize in these.

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:57 am

My personal pic lately goes to the Konosuke Fujiyama series. That's a personal preference though... :D

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Tue Oct 23, 2012 2:17 am

Suisin Inox Honyaki wins my award for best money-is-no-object 240mm gyuto on CKTG today.

Honorable mentions include Takeda 240mm AS, and Carter 210mm Funy with custom handle(would totally win if not for being basically disqualified based on length).

Re: Getting the best gyuto you offer.

Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:32 am

I gotta second Shaun here on the Kono Fujiyamas. Got to use one of these a little bit ago. They get crazy sharp and the convex grind on the blade makes it glide through everything like butter, nothing sticks to the blade.
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