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Flattening/lapping different grit water stones

Sat Jan 05, 2013 3:40 pm

I recently got the 140 grit diamond stone here to have a dedicated flattening stone. My thinking was just to save my DMT stones (coarse or extra-coarse) for sharpening. Anyway, do any of you use the finer grit diamond stones for flattening your finer grit water stones? I have some Shapton glass stones between 500 and 8k grits. Would the finer grit stones benefit by using a fine or extra-fine grit DMT stone as a final touch for flattening? I also have the normal Edge Pro stones. I would rather use finer grit stones for flattening IF it makes the finer grit stones perform better. Why put 140 grit scratches in a 8k sharpening stone?

Thanks for any help.


Jack

Re: Flattening/lapping different grit water stones

Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:25 pm

It does seem to help a little. I tend to just use the XXC plate to flatten all the stones when I'm done and then I rub the stones together progressively to smooth out the surfaces of the finer waterstones.

i.e. I flatten the 500, 1200, 4000 and 10000 all with the XXC plate.

Then I rub the flattened side of the 500 and 1200 together....then the 1200 and 4000 together and then the 1200 and 10000 together. It smoothes out the scratches in the 10k left from the XXC plate.

It makes it so that I don't have to get all three DMT plates out....they're heavy.

Re: Flattening/lapping different grit water stones

Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:32 am

Well there's flattening and then there's texturizing. If the stone is not close to flat, you need to flatten it first. That's where a good very coarse diamond plate is best. But if the stone is just a little out of flat, using a finer stone is nice - less stone 'wasted' and a nicer surface texture. For this a 400 or 600 grit diamond is nice. Now especially for finer stones a 1200 is nice to use for 'mud' to include in your sharpening, making it a bit more aggressive.

Note that for coarser stones a coarse flattener like the Atoma 140 or DMT XXC makes the stone cut more aggressively, which is what you want.

Lately I've been using a 'Wheel' of approximately 300 grit for texturizing and flattening (as yet unannounced) It works nicely on natural stones including finishers (awasedo).

It has the unusual characteristic that the 'hole in the donut' stays filled with water for a while, dolling out water as the stone gets texturized. If anyone is interested, I'll take pics / video of this.

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Ken

Re: Flattening/lapping different grit water stones

Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:35 am

ken123 wrote:Well there's flattening and then there's texturizing. If the stone is not close to flat, you need to flatten it first. That's where a good very coarse diamond plate is best. But if the stone is just a little out of flat, using a finer stone is nice - less stone 'wasted' and a nicer surface texture. For this a 400 or 600 grit diamond is nice. Now especially for finer stones a 1200 is nice to use for 'mud' to include in your sharpening, making it a bit more aggressive.

Note that for coarser stones a coarse flattener like the Atoma 140 or DMT XXC makes the stone cut more aggressively, which is what you want.

Lately I've been using a 'Wheel' of approximately 300 grit for texturizing and flattening (as yet unannounced) It works nicely on natural stones including finishers (awasedo).

It has the unusual characteristic that the 'hole in the donut' stays filled with water for a while, dolling out water as the stone gets texturized. If anyone is interested, I'll take pics / video of this.

---
Ken


I'd appreciate pictures of donuts and an explanationn of "texturizing". I'm not getting this at all.

Thanks.


Jack
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