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Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 1:05 am

I subscribe to the farm to fork philosophy as well as choosing meats and breeds for flavor. This is a red poll from my herd. 100% grass fed, no growth hormones or antibiotics.
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Here is a pic of a hanging half right before breakdown. Sorry about the lighting.
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Here is a pic of one of the primals
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And here is dinner. Poor mans filet, or eye of the round steaks. The flatter pieces or the ends of the loin that were not big enough to cut a filet out of. Seared well all sides in cast iron, finished in oven.
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Served with sliced baby Bella mushrooms and onions sautéed with garlic and butter. Side of green beans with onion and red wattle guanciale.
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Eye of round steaks are not my favorite cut, but it was still a good meal.

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 2:11 am

This is last years steer we slaughtered that was raised on my parents farm, and as with Red, 100% grass fed, no growth hormones or antibiotics.

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Quartered and in the walk-in to age.
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Forgot my camera when we butchered. Don't have much time for pictures anyway we are so busy. It will be time to slaughter again for us in mid-February.
I got all our knives that we use for slaughter and butchering from my dad this weekend just to make sure everything is sharp and ready to go.

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 4:49 am

Damn Jeff....das a BIG piece of moo there....

:)

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 5:28 am

I hear ya Rook! It was a year older than when we usually slaughter and about 400#s heavier. It was the best tasting and most tender beef we ever had! This years steer will be a repeat! Wish I could share some with you! We do our own pigs too!
Last edited by Jeff B on Mon Dec 30, 2013 5:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 5:34 am

Sorry Red, I didn't mean to highjack your thread! It's just cool to know there are others like us out there! My mom would have been going crazy for use to figure out how to make a rug out of the hide of the steer you butchered! Cool Color!

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:02 am

Like the way you do your steaks Red, right up my alley...."rarish"

Yum yum.

:)

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 4:48 pm

Red and Jeff, I wish the U.S. populace would learn more about how their beef, chicken and pork get into those pretty plastic packages at the supermarket and big box markets. The industrialization of agriculture is already having and will have a profound effect on the long term health of the people in this country.

Off soapbox now :-). What kind of saw to they use for splitting the carcass down the middle like that? Is is done while hanging? Just curious.

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 5:24 pm

I'm with ya Steve. We are trying to do our part with the education. We have a niche market. Not only do we raise them naturally, rotationally graze, nothing in confinement. Our pigs and chickens, egg layers as well as our broilers are outside on grass 24/7, we also have chosen specific breeds that thrive with this model and also are known for exceptional taste. All our breeds are recognized by the American livestock breeds conservancy as some level of endangered. Many of them are also recognized by slow food USA in the "Arc of Taste". In the arc of taste are red wattle pork, st croix and Tunis sheep, bourbon red turkey, and the American buff goose. We raise all of these as well as the red poll beef. The industry would have you believe that beef is beef, pork is pork, that way the only thing you should consider is price. Industry wins at this every time. My question is, when you go into a restaurant and order fish, do you say just bring me some fish? We all know salmon is different than cod. Ok off my soap box too Steve :)

Yes, it is halved while hanging. A stainless meat saw is used. It can be a hand saw, or in larger shops it can be an electric bandsaw that has a counter weight lift assist system.

All of our stuff is done under state inspected processing. So we can sell to anybody, within the state.

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 6:20 pm

Did you tan the hide? Is it thick enough for strops? I'm licking my chops :)

Re: Farm to fork

Mon Dec 30, 2013 6:38 pm

This one was not tanned. For us anyway. There is a place that gets them and buys them for that purpose. My daughter wants to do a rug. Strop material is a good idea :) I'll have to do this.
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