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Edge for fish

Wed Dec 11, 2013 7:29 pm

I would like to read what type, or what stone progression/finish everyone prefers for fish. I really like to give my knives a very refined edge with high polish, however, I have found out in the past its really not the best for poultry or fish. So I'd like to sit back and read what you have tried and prefer. I'm still looking for better ways and new things to try. Maybe it's a specific stone or grit level you stop at, or maybe a diamond spray for a slightly toothy bite. Ok, time to share...

Re: Edge for fish

Wed Dec 11, 2013 9:26 pm

For a suji/slicer I would typically finish with a Naniwa green brick or Arashiyama 6k, a lot of customers liked the edge from the green brick.

Re: Edge for fish

Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:54 am

I'll second Jason's recommendation. I prefer a little bite to the edge when breaking down whole fish (between 1k and 3k grit edges). I find it helps track through the skin better, making a cleaner cut. When I'm working a fillet skin off, I like the more refined edge of 6k and above. As long as the skin is off the fish I don't mind the feeling of a "running blade" (the opposite of a toothy edge). As with cutting fish for sushi for example, the texture of the fish from the cut is important and the result of a more refined edge is definitely noticeable. Poultry is not as demanding in my opinion and I prefer a toothier edge which for me, is most efficient. This is just my experience from experimenting while working in restaurants. I believe that a lot of one's edge preference has to do with cutting technique to find that "sweet spot".
Some knives don't have the metallurgical makeup to take an extremely fine edge. One example would be a VG-10 I once polished at 10k grit that sliced paper fantastic but never surpassed it's effectiveness from the green brick at 2k. It could cut just as well if not better off the 2k stone. Interesting to see how different a knife performs in a real world environment compared to paper. :)
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