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Re: Edge Chipping/Rolling

Fri May 10, 2013 2:10 pm

Great post Adam.

BDL

Re: Edge Chipping/Rolling

Fri May 10, 2013 2:33 pm

As was yours!! :)

Re: Edge Chipping/Rolling

Fri May 10, 2013 3:01 pm

Thanks for all the information Adam and BDL. You were both very helpful.
Now if I can keep it straight in my cerebral processor all will be well. :)

Re: Edge Chipping/Rolling

Fri May 10, 2013 5:40 pm

Interesting chart. Would it be safe to assume that the steels graphed with a high toughness would have a less edge retention? Or is edge retention a factor that requires a separate graph?

Re: Edge Chipping/Rolling

Fri May 10, 2013 6:12 pm

Probably safer to say that knives with high wear resistance have the capability to have the best edge retention.

10v is one of the steels that people swear by for edge retention.

Again, though, this is virtually too much generalization. Geometry, HT (grain refinement specifically), strength, etc. all matter too and maybe at least equally as much.

No matter the wear resistance of 10V, you make it too thin, or too soft and it won't hold an edge at all.

Re: Edge Chipping/Rolling

Sat May 11, 2013 2:46 pm

If you value edge retention uber alles, look at the metallurgical powder alloys.

However, unless you're a hobbyist knife collector, choosing one knife over another on the basis of the supposed materials properties of a particular alloy is a rookie mistake.

Taking it still further, a "balanced" alloy is a good thing, but even that can be overemphasized. For instance, the two generations past its sell by date 1085 (ish) which the Sabatiers still use for their carbons is anything but strong, but the knives are still outstanding performers even in a modern context. I'd sure as hell take a K-Sab au carbone over a Hiromoto AS as my go-to... and did.

If you're buying a knife and not a spec sheet, look at the gestalt of the knife, not the alloy.

BDL
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